imbricate

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im·bri·cate

, imbricated (im'bri-kāt, im'bri-kā-tĕd),
Overlapping; usually refers to a surgical repair in which one edge is sutured over the other (rather than edge to edge), or in which a flat structure (for example, fascia) is repaired with parallel suture lines, corset-like, to tighten it.
[L. imbricatus, covered with tiles]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

im·bri·cate

, imbricated (im'bri-kăt, -kā'tĕd)
Overlapping, like shingles.
[L. imbricatus, covered with tiles]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

imbricate

(of plant parts) overlapping at their edges like roof tiles, when in bud.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
How would it be possible for us to recover our commonality, not the ambiguous imperial-humanist myth of our shared human attributes which are supposed to distinguish us from animals, but, more significantly, the imbrication of our various pasts and presents the ineluctable relationships of shared and contested meanings, values, material resources" (Yale Journal of Criticism 2 [l989]: 13).
The modified retinacular imbrication technique (MRIT) is the most widely used technique for CCL rupture (Piermattei and Flo, 1997).
Animal evinced pain on palpating the left stifle joint and positive for the cranial drawer sign test and anterior tibial thrust which was suggestive of cranial cruciate ligament rupture, accordingly surgical stabilisation using both medial and lateral retinacular imbrication technique was planned.
The modified retinacular imbrication technique (MRIT) was performed as described by Piermattei and Flo (1997).
First, he advances a theory of imbrication. Second, he compares and contrasts his theory with past theorizing about the interaction of communication and technology.
Leonardi positions imbrication as a new sociomaterial perspective that denies "any separation of technology from organizing" (p.
In the final chapter, Leonardi concludes with a summary of the imbrication perspective that restores agency to humans and artifacts in the process of organizing and technological change.
Through the imbrication perspective, he squarely addresses the debate among communication, sociology, technology, and Internet researchers, landing in opposition to social constructivists by stating that technology has material agency but is devoid of intention (Latour, 1987; Pinch & Bijker, 1984; Poole & DeSanctis, 1990).