imbrication


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im·bri·ca·tion

(im'bri-kā'shŭn),
The operative overlapping of layers of tissue in the closure of wounds or the repair of defects.
[see imbricate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

im·bri·ca·tion

(im'bri-kā'shŭn)
The operative overlapping of layers of tissue in the closure of wounds or the repair of defects.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

imbrication

An overlapping of the free edges of a tissue as in the surgical correction of a tissue defect or of a weakened area.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The excellent accompanying exhibition catalogue/book (David Adjaye: Making Public Buildings, Thames and Hudson, [pounds sterling]29.95) has as its sub-title 'Specificity; Customization; Imbrication', which is banal description dressed up in theoretical language.
Les obstacles institutionnels sont nombreux : multiplicite des acteurs, complexite des enjeux, logiques d'action sectorielle, imbrication des echelles territoriales, absence de pouvoir d'agglomeration, etc.
The cogency of Hesmondhalgh's argument is supported in the structure of The Cultural Industries, where Part 1 develops an analytical framework utilizing an imbrication of disciplines to measure, evaluate and explain patterns of change and continuity.
For example, Holmes (1995) demonstrates the imbrication of authority (power) and gender although her work has a distinctly "production model" feel.
Chapter 3 focuses on the queer figures at the centre of Le Cousin Pons and La Cousine Bette in order to investigate further his comprehension of the imbrication of economic history, and histories of family practices and sexuality.
Nature, the imbrication with landscape and the creatures that inhabit it, and a perception of mystery that lets one believe in a positive solution all had a leading voice in the early books.
Sections of this ambitious book are well-covered in the existing historical literature, but Najia Aarim-Heriot provides a great service by mixing mastery of secondary literatures and new research to provide a sustained and insightful treatment of the imbrication of anti-Black and anti-Chinese racisms over a long and critical period.
Women in the transnational circuit of immigrant moves are crushed in the violent imbrication of gendered, raced and state power.
She, of course, does not simply replace one concern with another; rather, Lang demonstrates their mutual imbrication.
Here the analysis of empire might be reinforced by an analysis of capitalism which, in "modernity," would itself often seem to burst the bounds of any notion of a "restricted economy" and, in its imbrication with empire and its "sky's-the-limit" mentality, be prone to unrestrained and unconscionable forms of commodification, speculation, growth, profit-maximization, disdain for workers, levels of income for insiders, and environmentally wasteful expenditure.
In seeking to illuminate the Victorians' own methods of categorization, Black dismantles the binaries that so often bedevil modern analyses of the nineteenth century, unsettling distinctions between high art and popular culture, and insisting upon the imbrication of literary texts in the same historical circumstances that produced their spectacular and defining museological projects.
Moreover, she argues that the growing social imbrication between Turkish ruling "others" and the city's indigenous inhabitants, mainly Arab or Berber, are indicators of larger transformations.