imbricated


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

imbricated

 [im´brĭ-kāt″ed]
overlapping like shingles.

im·bri·cate

, imbricated (im'bri-kāt, im'bri-kā-tĕd),
Overlapping; usually refers to a surgical repair in which one edge is sutured over the other (rather than edge to edge), or in which a flat structure (for example, fascia) is repaired with parallel suture lines, corset-like, to tighten it.
[L. imbricatus, covered with tiles]

imbricated

/im·bri·cat·ed/ (im´brĭ-kāt″id) overlapping like shingles.

im·bri·cate

, imbricated (im'bri-kăt, -kā'tĕd)
Overlapping, like shingles.
[L. imbricatus, covered with tiles]

imbricated

overlapping like shingles or roof slates or tiles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, we can state that the three-level inverter structure with imbricated switching cells doubles the output switching frequency.
Taken as a whole, this excellent collection ought to spur scholarly interest in the way that early modern cultural logics can be imbricated with the mathematical discourse that has for too long been kept in abeyance; as the essays suggest, numerical thought need not be read solely in terms of an orthodox historiography that has stressed order, transparency, and rationality, but might rather be set in less "proper" discursive spaces than those of Euclid and Descartes.
A single piece of Surgicel was rolled tightly into a cigar shape and imbricated into the site.
At the Third Book's mid-point, Duval argues that the design of the book is centripetal, so that the imbricated episodes are constructed around a "unique center" (Design, TL, 124) borrowed from a proverb in Erasmus' Adagia, "Congnois Toy," or the Socratic "Know thyself.
Antle's study is significant in that it recognizes the necessity of addressing several imbricated features of what can only be called a surrealist hegemony.
The superabsorbent-containing entities are imbricated so that a leading edge of some of the superabsorbent-containing entities overlaps a trailing edge of a superabsorbent entity.
While a variety of social structures are imbricated in the case of domestic violence, the ways in which partner abuse get articulated in mass-mediated culture serves to complicate further the ways in which society can (and does) respond to such violence.
Socrates makes a brief comment that every natural element in the world is imbricated in every other, from which one can make an imaginative leap to the rabbinic belief in a similar imbrication between every verse in the Hebrew Bible.
And while the twin menaces of nuclear and alien invasions were imbricated in the Red Scare decade--in such kitsch film classics as The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) and Invaders from Mars (1953)--the former threat has largely faded from the public mind while the latter has grown apace.
In so doing, he demonstrates, yet again, the way in which race is imbricated in all aspects of American cultural and political life.
He is careful to state that he used oral history not to complement archival sources but to "arrive at an enmeshed, intertwined and imbricated web of narratives" (194).
So deeply is the habit and culture of corporal punishment imbricated with the national psyche that whole shelves of specialist literature, to say nothing of entire racks of newspapers and magazines, are regularly devoted to the subject.