imbricated


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imbricated

 [im´brĭ-kāt″ed]
overlapping like shingles.

im·bri·cate

, imbricated (im'bri-kāt, im'bri-kā-tĕd),
Overlapping; usually refers to a surgical repair in which one edge is sutured over the other (rather than edge to edge), or in which a flat structure (for example, fascia) is repaired with parallel suture lines, corset-like, to tighten it.
[L. imbricatus, covered with tiles]

im·bri·cate

, imbricated (im'bri-kăt, -kā'tĕd)
Overlapping, like shingles.
[L. imbricatus, covered with tiles]
References in periodicals archive ?
The power circuit of the three-level inverter with imbricated cells and the control strategy are presented in Fig.
The superabsorbent-containing entities are imbricated so that a leading edge of some of the superabsorbent-containing entities overlaps a trailing edge of a superabsorbent entity.
While a variety of social structures are imbricated in the case of domestic violence, the ways in which partner abuse get articulated in mass-mediated culture serves to complicate further the ways in which society can (and does) respond to such violence.
Socrates makes a brief comment that every natural element in the world is imbricated in every other, from which one can make an imaginative leap to the rabbinic belief in a similar imbrication between every verse in the Hebrew Bible.
And while the twin menaces of nuclear and alien invasions were imbricated in the Red Scare decade--in such kitsch film classics as The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) and Invaders from Mars (1953)--the former threat has largely faded from the public mind while the latter has grown apace.
In so doing, he demonstrates, yet again, the way in which race is imbricated in all aspects of American cultural and political life.
Through oral history, he arrives at complex and nuanced positions regarding issues of "subalternity." He is careful to state that he used oral history not to complement archival sources but to "arrive at an enmeshed, intertwined and imbricated web of narratives" (194).
There is almost no English surname, however ancient and dignified, that cannot be instantly improved by the prefix "Spanker." So deeply is the habit and culture of corporal punishment imbricated with the national psyche that whole shelves of specialist literature, to say nothing of entire racks of newspapers and magazines, are regularly devoted to the subject.
At this point it is clear that colonial and nationalist histories are deeply imbricated in one another.
For neither text nor performance points to a stable identity; each term marks out an arena of shifting practices of production and reception, where signification is imbricated in a close-grained fabric of values, attitudes, identities, and desires, in ideology itself.
Her reluctance to move beyond Othello seems perverse as such examples could only strengthen the assertion that dramatic and other texts are imbricated in historical moments.
A pattern of predominantly proximally imbricated crystallites characterizes older, more proximal walls.