imbecility


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imbecility

 [im″bĕ-sil´ĭ-te]
old term for intermediate forms of mental retardation, now considered offensive.

imbecility

An obsolete term for an IQ of 25–54.

imbecility

(ĭm″bĕ-sĭl′ĭ-tē)
Moderate to severe mental retardation.

imbecility

a state of mind in which an animal does feeble, weak, absurd things and does not respond to usual environmental stimuli. Usually congenital. See also hydranencephaly, encephalopathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gissing's reference to the "crass imbecility of the typical woman" needs to be placed in relation to what James W.
The supposed incapacity of Carrie Buck, her mother, and her infant daughter inspired Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes' famous conclusion: "It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind.
See also Reiss, 119, citing Montaigne's estimation of law as "a true testimony of human imbecility, so full it is of contradiction and error," 3.
I don't know about the cases James Berger speaks of, as he provides only one detail (which suggests imbecility more than bad faith), but I'm sure there is anti-Semitism on the left, as there is everywhere there are non-Jews.
And further, "The reason for the difference [between the roles of men and women] is on account of the fragility, imbecility and less natural constancy and discernment of women.
Holmes, by then perhaps the most revered judge in America, wrote an opinion that proclaimed: "It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind.
In Bell's case, matters went further than mere detention, because a Virginia statute of 1924 provided that "the health of the patient and the welfare of society may be promoted in certain cases by the sterilization of mental defectives, under careful safeguard; that the Commonwealth is supporting in various institutions many defective persons who if discharged would become a menace but if incapable of procreating might be discharged with safety and become self-supporting with benefit to themselves and to society; and that experience has shown that heredity played an important part in the transmission of insanity, imbecility, & c.
Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Homes wrote, "It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind.
The complexity of the issue is increased because the concept of Benjy's eternal childhood does not stem from his age, but from his imbecility.
Written by Dinitia Smith, a Times staffer, the profile is a specimen of contemporary moral imbecility.
And as Douglass argues in "Claims of the Negro," the features most often presented as typically "Negroid" are "distorted, lips exaggerated, forehead depressed--and the whole expression of the countenance made to harmonize with the popular idea of Negro imbecility and degradation" (298).
Disagreeable inherited traits, from imbecility to alcoholism to criminality, are abolished by sterilizing the people who inherited them.