imbecile

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imbecile

 [im´bĕ-sil]
old term for a person with an intermediate grade of mental retardation, now considered offensive.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

im·be·cile

(im'bĕ-sil),
An obsolete term for a subclass of mental retardation or an individual classified therein.
[L. imbecillus, weak, silly]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

imbecile

(ĭm′bə-sĭl, -səl)
n.
1. A person who is considered foolish or stupid.
2. A person with moderate to severe intellectual disability having a mental age of from three to seven years and generally being capable of some degree of communication and performance of simple tasks under supervision. The term belongs to a classification system no longer in use and is now considered offensive.

im′be·cil′ic (-sĭl′ĭk) adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

imbecile

Neurology
An obsolete term for a person with an intellectual disability above that of an idiot, which is now subdivided into either moderate (IQ 35–49) or severe (IQ 20–34) mental retardation.
 
Vox populi
A derogatory term used indiscriminately for an obtuse person, regardless of that person’s tested IQ.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

imbecile

An obsolete term for a mentally retarded person or, nowadays, a person with severe learning difficulty.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In January 1925 he had traced the popular black drama to the blackface minstrel show in which white actors "imitated" the supposed imbecilities of blacks; black actors had unfortunately tried to "fit" into the same tradition: "It was to this vogue that the builders of colored musical comedies and revues went to school" ("Same" 15).