imagery


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imagery

 [im´ij-re]
1. a group of images or mental pictures.
2. the use of images to describe something.
simple guided imagery in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful use of imagination to achieve relaxation and/or direct attention away from undesirable sensations.

im·age·ry

(im'ăj-rē),
A technique in behavior therapy in which the client or patient is conditioned to substitute pleasant fantasies to counter the unpleasant feelings associated with anxiety.

imagery

/im·age·ry/ (im´aj-re)
1. the formation of a mental representation of something perceived by the senses.
2. any of a number of therapeutic techniques that use the formation of such representations to elicit changes in attitudes, behaviors, or physiologic reactions.

guided imagery  a therapeutic technique in which the patient enters a relaxed state and focuses on an image related to the issue being confronted, which the therapist uses as the basis of an interactive dialogue to help resolve the issue.

imagery

(ĭm′ĭj-rē)
n. pl. image·ries
Psychology A technique in behavior therapy in which the patient uses pleasant fantasies to relax and counteract anxiety.

imagery

[im′ijrē]
Etymology: L, imago
(in psychiatry) the formation of mental concepts, figures, or ideas; any product of the imagination. An imagery technique is applied therapeutically to decrease anxiety. See also guided imagery.

imagery

Alternative medicine
A therapeutic format in which the power of the mind is used to evoke a positive physical response so as to reduce stress, slow the heart rate, stimulate the immune system and reduce pain. Imagery consists of the creation of positive thoughts and images and communicating them with the body as a means of healing a diseased organ or tissue; it is believed to act on the psychoneuroimmune system by placing the power of the mind over physical ailment.

Anecdotal reports suggest that imaging may be effective for allergies, cancer, chronic pain, control of habits, dysmenorrhoea, headaches, hypertension, enhancing the immune system, performance anxiety (stage fright), premenstrual syndrome, stress-related GI symptoms, recuperation from surgery and urinary incontinence.

imagery

Psychology The evoking of a visual, audio, or other internalized mental image, that retains the 'flavor' and sensory qualities of an original external stimulus; a technique in which a person focuses on positive mental images. See Chemical imagery, Fictive imagery, Guided imagery, Hypnagogic imagery, Interactive guided imagery, Memory imagery, Perceptual imagery, Relaxing imagery.

im·ag·e·ry

(im'ăj-rē)
A technique in behavior therapy in which the client or patient is conditioned to substitute pleasant fantasies to counter the unpleasant feelings associated with anxiety.

imagery

the process of forming symbolic mental representations of objects, events or actions, which may be in any of the sensory modes. In sport psychology the effective and deliberate use of imagery is considered to be one of the fundamental mental skills for sports performers and is used for mental rehearsal, motivation, relaxation and stress management. external imagery is that engaged in from a third person perspective as if an external observer were watching the person doing the imaging; internal imagery is that engaged in from the first-person perspective of the person doing the imaging. In kinaesthetic imagery the person images bodily movements or sensations. In visual imagery the person creates a mental picture of an object, event or action, also known as visualization. See also psychoneuromuscular theory.

imagery

1. Process of recalling past visual experiences. 2. Synonym for visualization. See visual image.
References in periodicals archive ?
Training duration: To date, imagery studies have used a variety of strength tasks as well as differing volumes and frequencies of imagery training.
Types of skills: If imagery perspective affects the effective use of imagery, then investigating the use of imagery perspectives is imperative to understanding how to use imagery effectively (Morris et al.
The Journal of Dance Medicine and Science, Kinesiology and Medicine for Dance, Journal of Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance, and Journal of Mental Imagery from January 1, 1987, to March 10, 2015, were all hand-searched because the focus of these journals relates closely to the topic of this review.
Articles were deemed relevant if the topic of study was not only dance but imagery as well; both topics needed to be the focus of the research for the article to be included.
Multiple regression analysis results indicated that athlete sex and sport skill type were associated with the frequency of imagery use; CS (F(2,334) = 12.
With regards to sex differences and imagery use, it was hypothesized that male athletes would use imagery more frequently than their female counterparts.
Paired f-tests were used to determine differences between imagery and no-imagery conditions for all dependent variables for the IMTP (GRF and RFD) and CMJ (GRF, force plate, and EPIC jump height).
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of imagery on absolute and explosive force.
The factor structure of visual imagery and spatial abilities.
The Spanish version of the Betts' Questionnaire Upon Mental Imagery.
However, nineteen players from both imagery and control groups dropped out of the study at the end of the program because they did not participate in games which underwent match analysis either as pre or post test occasions.
Given that the previous studies have frequently suggested using a manipulation check as part of any imagery intervention, we were going to assign all participants to an interview to examine individual athlete's ongoing and previous imagery use.