illusory

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illusory

(i-loo′sŏ-rē) [L. illusorius, mocking, ironic]
Pert. to or causing an illusion; misleading; deceptive.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the moment of decision, role, act, and critique, as well as providence, freedom, and court, all interact, and the illusiveness of earthly reality achieves the power of truth.
And even, in my illusiveness, there is one person I haven't been able to fool, ME!
And Pierre says, or Melville says speaking for Pierre in the third person, "The more and more that he wrote, and the deeper and deeper that he dived, Pierre saw the everlasting illusiveness of truth."
Caution is demanded for a number of practical reasons including our inability to understand fully the interrelatedness of species and their interactions with biota of ecosystems, the ongoing struggle to model the effects of technologies, and the illusiveness of the synergistic effects of chemicals so prolifically emitted into the air, spread on the land, and flushed into waterways.
I believe that one of my strong points in writing poetry is my illusiveness. A lot of people accuse me of being obscure, but it's not so much obscurity as it is the fact that my sense of the canniness of the discussion of language and making metaphor is very ...
In The Birth of Tragedy, for example, he argues that "Dionysus speaks the language of Apollo; and Apollo, finally, the language of Dionysus."(18) De Man owes a great deal to Nietzsche's attraction to misleading experiences and concepts, and like Nietzsche and Derrida, de Man too aligns emotions and signs on the basis of their common illusiveness. Metaphors seem figural but act to establish a faux-literal order, in comparison to emotions; but it seems that emotions, which as it were know the uncertainty of interpretation, can also act to establish a faux-literal order which contradicts their own knowledge.
The common core in all of their theorizing was the notion that foundational "realities" were discovered to be illusive, moreover, this illusiveness was found to be disturbingly necessary (Pearce, 1989).
And while Troy/Travolta is of course merely "acting" the part of passionate husband (to neglected wife Eve [Joan Allen]) and firm but understanding father (to rebellious teenage daughter Jamie), the point of his impersonation is not to underscore the illusiveness of the "happy nuclear family." Rather, Face/Off seems here to suggest that the husband/father role is itself sufficient to evoke noble patriarchal instincts in any man, given that the male figure assumes his position within the "right" family.
As her brother Tom dreams of escaping his dreary life at home, faint, nostalgic music from the "Paradise Dance Hall" drifts in through the apartment window, a sad, ironic comment on the illusiveness of Tom's hopes and those of the times.