illusional


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il·lu·sion·al

(i-lū'zhŭn-ăl),
Relating to or of the nature of an illusion.

il·lu·sion·al

(i-lū'zhŭn-ăl)
Relating to or of the nature of an illusion.

illusional

Pert. to, or of the nature of, an illusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
She spent a whopping 230 hours on the Alan Carr portrait, putting an image of him into a computer programme to create a pattern, before painstakingly placing each strand of wool to make up the illusional art.
Genealogically speaking, the historical-conceptual approach recognizes that only shorter periods can be meaningfully analyzed, and while contemporary discourses can be compared with each other, the broader temporal scope favored by historical-developmental narratives is, in the last analysis, illusional.
Adept at sending up the cultural pillars of truth which bolster oppression, collage is often associated with cubism, striving to be representational without being illusional.
They all have in common the refusal of any illusional effect whatsoever.
ORS generally is regarded as delusional, with possible secondary illusional misinterpretations and referential thinking.
Schatz does not want merely to see his subjects or look upon their images; he wants the experience of connecting with the homeless away from the chaos of their transient environments, as if the illusional eye-to-eye contact, facilitated by the fall of a shutter, is akin to a form of communion.
Meyerhold consciously worked to liberate theatrical space from the box-set with its illusional painted scenery and proscenium arch.
So, he decided by himself, reminding his own illusional bubble, to halt his ambivalence and bring his life near to anyone else life.