illness experience

illness experience

the process of being ill. A commonly used model is Suchman's stages of illness, comprising five stages: stage I, experiencing a symptom; stage II, assuming a sick role; stage III, making contact for health care; stage IV, being dependent (a patient); and stage V, recovering or being rehabilitated. Each stage is characterized by certain decisions, behaviors, and end points. During stage I, in which a symptom is experienced, the person decides that something is wrong and seeks a remedy. Stage I ends with the person's accepting the reality of the symptom, no longer delaying any action toward help or denying the symptom (flight into health). During stage II the person decides that the illness is real and that care is necessary. Advice, guidance, and validation are sought. This stage gives the person permission to act sick and to be excused temporarily from usual obligations. The outcome of this stage is acceptance of the role-or denial of its necessity. In stage III, professional advice is sought. Authoritative declarations identify and validate the illness and legitimize the sick role. The person usually asks for help and negotiates for treatment. Denial may still occur, and the patient may "shop" further for medical care or may accept the illness, the medical authority, and the plan for treatment. In stage IV, professional treatment is performed and accepted by the person, who is now perceived as a patient. At any time during this stage the dependent patient may experience ambivalent feelings and may decide to reject the treatment, the caregiver, and the illness. More often care is accepted with ambivalence. The patient has a particular need to be informed and to be given emotional support during this stage. During stage V the patient relinquishes the sick role. The usual tasks and roles are reassumed to the greatest degree possible. Some people do not willingly give up the sick role, becoming in their own eyes chronically ill, or they may, for secondary gain, malinger, acting sick. Most people accept recovery and work toward rehabilitation.

ill·ness ex·pe·ri·ence

(il'nĕs eks-pēr'ē-ĕns)
A patient's report of her/his illness, not just the clinical signs and symptoms; a concept in patient-centered interviewing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The PACIC is an existing, validated, and comprehensive patient self-report instrument developed by Glasgow and collaborators to evaluate whether patients with chronic illness experience care that aligns with models of chronic-care delivery (Glasgow et al.
Among their topics are the illness experience, psychosocial adjustment, quality of life, family caregiving, culture and diversity, client and family education, the advanced practice registered nurse in chronic illness care, complementary and integrative health, home health care, and long-term care.
Conceptually defining uncertainty in the context of illness rather than merely by the dictionary definition allows healthcare professionals to begin to glean the meaning of the illness experience of individuals experiencing uncertainty (Chinn & Kramer, 2011).
Most importantly, they provide support and empathy that comes from personal mental illness experience.
Background: The patients with diverse cardiac issues and physical illness experience different levels of social intolerance, depression, anxiety and stress.
Depending on the research question, it can be used to investigate the illness experience of one individual or a group, to compare individual experiences, to survey shared cultural aspects, health behaviour categories or narrating modes of certain cultural groups (1).
Online, participants can negotiate, redefine, and reinvent existing cultural codes to make sense of their illness experience and the impact it has on identity formation (Bar-Lev, 2008).
In addition to advocating for increased understanding and recognition of the impacts of arthritis, Otto also wants to focus future work on the positive aspects of the illness experience.
The Napthine Government s new Mental Health Act 2014 which came into effect 1July this year is changing the way people with a mental illness experience treatment and support.
These various constructions are reflected through online discourse, further directing people's responses to policies, social norms, and illness experiences and forming a reinforcing spiral of online discourse and illness experience.
There is also evidence of nurses' impact on the illness experience, as patients noted that some nurses were "better than others" (p.