illegitimate

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Related to illegitimates: illegitimacy, Out-of-wedlock

illegitimate

(ĭl′ĭ-jĭt′ə-mĭt)
adj.
1.
a. Being against established or accepted rules and standards: an illegitimate means of winning a debate.
b. Being against the law; illegal: an illegitimate contract.
c. Not valid or defensible: Their reasons for missing school are illegitimate.
d. Incorrectly deduced; illogical: an illegitimate conclusion.
e. Biology Unacceptable as a scientific name because of not conforming to the international rules of nomenclature.
2. Offensive Born to parents not married to each other.

il′le·git′i·mate·ly adv.

illegitimate

[il′ejit′imit]
Etymology: L, in, not, lex, law
1 not authorized by law.
3 abnormal.

il·le·git·i·mate

(il'lĕ-jit'i-măt)
An older, and now strongly pejorative, descriptive term for a child born to an unmarried woman.
[L. in-, not + legimatus, lawful]
References in periodicals archive ?
The liberal Code proved detrimental to illegitimate children and their mothers filing paternity suits, as the Code came to reinforce the patriarchal liberal order.
The Casa de Huerfanos, entrusted by the state with caring for many orphans, further established the children in its care as orphans by denying the existence of their illegitimate fathers.
Using court and notary records, Milanich focuses on families that took in kinless children, as well as the children themselves, to conclude that child circulation constituted a form of welfare provision for illegitimate children.
As a consequence, illegitimate children found themselves in new webs of exploitation and dependencies, as they became domestic labourers in plebeian households.
A woman responding to a survey about the experience of illegitimates in 1986 said that her mother "was put in an orphanage and did not get full knowledge about her parents until she was 55.
As the case of Dorothy Hatcher showed, many illegitimates led completely unsettled home lives, marred by constant shuttling between a variety of guardians and/or state services.
However, illegitimates had the added difficulty of constant questions about their identity.
Another experience shared by illegitimates was the disruption of family relationships, and the tensions this caused in their lives.
In fact, these cases also showed another aspect of the instability of casual "adoptions" of illegitimates by their families.
Not all illegitimates faced hostility from their families and neighbors, but this did not mean that they escaped all the difficulties.
Many illegitimates resented not knowing who their fathers were or any of the circumstances of their births.
68) Even illegitimates with basically happy lives regretted having no relationship with their fathers.