iliotibial band syndrome


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Related to iliotibial band syndrome: Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome, Piriformis syndrome

iliotibial band syndrome

a syndrome of knee pain that may result from inflammation due to mechanical friction of the iliotibial band and the lateral femoral epicondyle.
See also: iliotibial band friction syndrome.

iliotibial band syndrome

Tensor fasciae latae syndrome, TFL syndrome Sports medicine A common running injury, which is the most common cause of lateral knee pain in runners Muscles involved Gluteus maximus, tensor fasciae latae Clinical Lateral knee pain, a quasi-pathognomonic finding, often worse after running, especially after climbing hills or stairs; may be associated with a 'snapping hip', in which muscles crossing the outside of the hip can be felt to snap or click during walking or running Etiology Over-training, attributed to recurrent friction of the iliotibial band sliding over the lateral femoral epicondyle pulling on the lateral insertion near the knee bursa, which becomes inflamed Management Acute phase– ↓ activity, ice massage, NSAIDs, phonophoresis, steroid injections for refractory swelling; rehab–progressive stretching, sprints, gradual ↑ to running distance. See Running.

il·i·o·tib·i·al band fric·tion syn·drome

(il'ē-ō-tib'ē-ăl band frik'shŭn sin'drōm)
A painful condition affecting the hip, thigh, or knee; produced by irritation of the iliotibial tract as it glides over the greater trochanter, anterior superior iliac spine, Gerdy tubercle, or the lateral femoral condyle; sometimes associated with a snapping or grating sensation.
Synonym(s): iliotibial band syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Athletes have utilized this technique for mild symptoms of iliotibial band syndrome and have been able to continue running without losing practice time.
In general, osteoarthritis and trochanteric bursitis are more common in older, less active patients, whereas stress fractures, iliopsoas strain or bursitis, and iliotibial band syndrome are more common in athletes.
Lateral hip pain or considerable tightness may indicate iliotibial band syndrome.
Assuming you are dealing with iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), while it is most common among runners, it can also occur in cyclists.
* Often, Iliotibial Band Syndrome hits less experienced runners who increase mileage too fast.
It is the leading question for functional leg length discrepancy, which along with actual leg length discrepancy are risk factors for Iliotibial Band Syndrome.
Don't let a metatarsal fracture, iliotibial band syndrome, patellar tendinitis, Achilles tendinitis or just about any other lower body injury keep you from your regular run.
Iliotibial band syndrome is a common affliction of young runners, as well as adult long distance runners.
Although I would like to know more about your training schedule and the surfaces you run on, a common problem runners experience is the iliotibial band syndrome. The iliotibial band is the tract that runs up the outside of your thigh and attaches to the outside part of your knee.
Treatment of iliotibial band syndrome includes rest while the problem heals, then gradually increasing activity as long as you are pain free.