ileitis


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ileitis

 [il″e-i´tis]
inflammation of the ileum; it may result from infection, obstruction, severe irritation, or faulty absorption of material through the intestinal walls. See also crohn's disease. The advanced stage is marked by hardening, thickening, and ulceration of parts of the bowel lining. An obstruction may cause the development of a fistula. A common symptom of ileitis is pain in the lower right quadrant of the abdomen or around the umbilicus. Other symptoms include loss of appetite, loss of weight, anemia, and diarrhea, which may alternate with periods of constipation. Treatment may require medication to remove any source of infection, special diet, or surgery if there is obstruction.
distal ileitis Crohn's disease.
regional ileitis (terminal ileitis) Crohn's disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

il·e·i·tis

(il'ē-ī'tis),
Inflammation of the ileum.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ileitis

(ĭl′ē-ī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the ileum.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ileitis

1. Inflammation of the ileum. See Backwash ileitis.
2. Crohn's disease, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

il·e·i·tis

(il'ē-ī'tis)
Inflammation of the ileum.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ileitis

See REGIONAL ILEITIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Oppenheimer, "Regional ileitis: a pathologic and clinical entity," Journal of the American Medical Association, vol.
Calasan et al., "Dysbiotic gut microbiota causes transmissible Crohn's disease-like ileitis independent of failure in antimicrobial defence," Gut, vol.
Other causes of infectious terminal ileitis include Yersinia and Campylobacter, but they generally involve the jejunum as well.(12)
Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of ileitis, or porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE) which is an enteric disease in swine.
The research included 198 patients of whom 50.5% were women, 43.4% with ulcerative colitis (5.8% proctitis, 43% with left colitis and 51.2% with pancolitis) and 56.6% with CD (ileitis 54%, 3% in the presence of the large intestine, 43% ileocolic disease).
andK.Gopinath(2011).Mycobacteriumavium subspecies Paratuberculosis and Crohn's regional ileitis: How strong is AssociationJ.
To find the studies, the researchers searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane central trials registry for randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies published in any language and that included the terms ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis, or ileitis. This approach yielded six population-based and two hospital-based case-control studies, and three population-based cohort studies.
Her upper GIl series, performed only a few weeks prior, reported "duodenitis with probably worsening," and intestinal biopsy, done around the same time, reported "chronic inflammatory ileitis with time interval improvement" (likely due to anti-inflammatory medications and high doses of prednisone).
Acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, a constituent of a herbal medicine from Boswellia serrata resin, attenuates experimental ileitis. Int J Colorectal Dis.
(60) In the case of IBD models such as SAMPl/Yit mutant mice on the AKR background with spontaneous ileitis, (69) and mice with dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis, neither ileitis nor colitis developed in ex-GF mice that were not only associated with basal flora but also mono-associated with IBD-derived Bacteroides vulgatus.
A foodborne pathogen associated with undercooked pork, Yersinia enterocolitica is a gram-negative coccobacillus causing appendicitis, ileitis, colitis, and mesenteric lymphadenitis (l).