idiosyncrasy


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Related to idiosyncrasy: drug idiosyncrasy

idiosyncrasy

 [id″e-o-sing´krah-se]
1. a habit or quality of body or mind peculiar to any individual.
2. an abnormal susceptibility to an agent (e.g., a drug) that is peculiar to the individual. adj., adj idiosyncrat´ic.

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

(id'ē-ō-sin'kră-sē), Avoid the misspelling idiosyncracy.
1. A particular mental, behavioral, or physical characteristic or peculiarity.
2. In pharmacology, an abnormal reaction to a drug, sometimes specified as genetically determined.
[G. idiosynkrasia, fr. idios, one's own, + synkrasis, a mixing together]

idiosyncrasy

(ĭd′ē-ō-sĭng′krə-sē)
n. pl. idiosyncra·sies
1. A structural or behavioral characteristic peculiar to an individual or group.
2. A physiological or temperamental peculiarity.
3. An unusual individual reaction to food or a drug.

id′i·o·syn·crat′ic (-sĭn-krăt′ĭk) adj.
id′i·o·syn·crat′i·cal·ly adv.

idiosyncrasy

Therapeutics A Pt-specific constellation of reactions to a particular drug–eg, insomnia, tremor, weakness, dizziness, or cardiac arrhythmias, which may be seen in some Pts taking adrenergic amines.

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

(id'ē-ō-singk'ră-sē)
1. A person's mental, behavioral, or physical characteristic or peculiarity.
2. pharmacology An abnormal reaction to a drug, sometimes specified as genetically determined.
[G. idiosynkrasia, fr. idios, one's own, + synkrasis, a mixing together]

idiosyncrasy

1. A physiological or mental peculiarity.
2. A tendency to react abnormally to a drug, often in a manner characteristic of the response to a much larger dose than that taken. An individual hypersensitivity to a drug, not of an allergic nature.

Idiosyncrasy

A defect in that particular pathway resulting in an abnormality.

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

(id'ē-ō-singk'ră-sē)
1. Particular mental, behavioral, or physical characteristic or peculiarity.
2. In pharmacology, abnormal reaction to a drug.
[G. idiosynkrasia, fr. idios, one's own, + synkrasis, a mixing together]
References in periodicals archive ?
Inclusive leadership and the idiosyncrasy credit model provide an alternative, accessible framework for practical leadership.
The twentieth century began for Mexican architecture with the assimilation of the austere and radical language of the Modern Movement; its finest moment was the syncretism of modernity and Mexican idiosyncrasy in Luis Barragan; our new century begins with these grand projects that manifest a respect for place and long-term economic sustainability.
Despite Owens's studied idiosyncrasy, her paintings are relatively detached and emotionally cool; that's part of their openness.
We have to allow for at least this much deconstructionism and idiosyncrasy, even in the ascendancy of consumerism after perestroika.
The Diana camera--an apparatus cheaply made in the early 1960s that subsequently developed a cult following not unlike that of Pixelvison video--might be described as a subjectivity machine, a device for the manufacture of idiosyncrasy. So much so, in fact, that it seems wrong to refer to the brand in the singular; really, we should only ever speak of particular Diana cameras, since their inherent flaws ensure that each Diana distorts images in its own peculiar way.
These are the uniforms Suh wore at school, and the intimate relation between the artist's memories and the material he at one time donned intensifies a painful sense of idiosyncrasy repressed by protocol.
Intricacy and idiosyncrasy were in ample evidence, as was the slightly mad, sweetly obsessive love of swaybacked shelf and toppling pile.
This attitude was engendered not only by the nature of the medium as it was generally understood at the time, but especially by the insatiable appetite of his gaze and even more by its idiosyncrasy. Rather than the dimensions of nineteenth-century history painting or the more or less calculated rarity that now seems to define the status of the new photography, isn't it this singularity of the gaze that is likely to lead to a truly artistic vision of the world, especially when, as in Ghirri's case, it remains discernible whatever the subject may be, a service station or a seascape?
"An expression of cultural hybridity" would be the lazy description of Hew Locke's enormous installation Hemmed In, 1999, but that tired formula does the work's sheer idiosyncrasy a deep injustice.
In th e end, what is most impressive is the infectious sense of liberty and idiosyncrasy with which he places the individual unit within the overall flow, most notably in Cabinessence, where a few unpredictably placed egg-shaped blobs of blue, red, and black steal the show from a vast expanse of pale metallic hues.
The tendency in contemporary art is to gild an existing genre with some stylistic idiosyncrasy that extends its life span in a surprising fashion.
By approving of Reinhardt's idiosyncrasy (as the Abstract Expressionist who wasn't), Sylvester marks the sensibility of his own generation, those for whom professional life began with the Atomic Age in the late 1940s - in terms of art, not the time of the Abstract Expressionists, but of Neo-Dada or Pop.