idiosyncrasy

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idiosyncrasy

 [id″e-o-sing´krah-se]
1. a habit or quality of body or mind peculiar to any individual.
2. an abnormal susceptibility to an agent (e.g., a drug) that is peculiar to the individual. adj., adj idiosyncrat´ic.

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

(id'ē-ō-sin'kră-sē), Avoid the misspelling idiosyncracy.
1. A particular mental, behavioral, or physical characteristic or peculiarity.
2. In pharmacology, an abnormal reaction to a drug, sometimes specified as genetically determined.
[G. idiosynkrasia, fr. idios, one's own, + synkrasis, a mixing together]

idiosyncrasy

(ĭd′ē-ō-sĭng′krə-sē)
n. pl. idiosyncra·sies
1. A structural or behavioral characteristic peculiar to an individual or group.
2. A physiological or temperamental peculiarity.
3. An unusual individual reaction to food or a drug.

id′i·o·syn·crat′ic (-sĭn-krăt′ĭk) adj.
id′i·o·syn·crat′i·cal·ly adv.

idiosyncrasy

Therapeutics A Pt-specific constellation of reactions to a particular drug–eg, insomnia, tremor, weakness, dizziness, or cardiac arrhythmias, which may be seen in some Pts taking adrenergic amines.

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

(id'ē-ō-singk'ră-sē)
1. A person's mental, behavioral, or physical characteristic or peculiarity.
2. pharmacology An abnormal reaction to a drug, sometimes specified as genetically determined.
[G. idiosynkrasia, fr. idios, one's own, + synkrasis, a mixing together]

idiosyncrasy

1. A physiological or mental peculiarity.
2. A tendency to react abnormally to a drug, often in a manner characteristic of the response to a much larger dose than that taken. An individual hypersensitivity to a drug, not of an allergic nature.

Idiosyncrasy

A defect in that particular pathway resulting in an abnormality.

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

(id'ē-ō-singk'ră-sē)
1. Particular mental, behavioral, or physical characteristic or peculiarity.
2. In pharmacology, abnormal reaction to a drug.
[G. idiosynkrasia, fr. idios, one's own, + synkrasis, a mixing together]
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 presents the idiosyncrasies that may occur in the following areas:
"For many people their only connection to politics, in the form of Parliament or politicians, is through the lens of the media, and they are often only made aware of politicians through coverage of personal indiscretions, idiosyncrasies or 'sleaze'.
With Britons forever picking at the idiosyncrasies of its European neighbours, German journalist Christian Schubert has redressed the balance a little and has written a book about the British.
There are also certain idiosyncrasies, but these add to its charm.
At the same time the humanists became gradually aware that the Latin of the classical period too had been subject to a permanent evolution and that authors of a specific period each had their own linguistic idiosyncrasies. Particularly, grammarians of the Baroque applied themselves to an ever more-refined distinction between periods, as is clearly illustrated by S.
The company has almost 500 accounts in the system, or 90% of their suppliers, about as many as Gualdi expects will ever migrate to the new way since some companies, such as textiles makers, simply have too many idiosyncrasies in their products to go fully online.
The book focuses on being resourceful in working with agencies, finding therapies, disciplining and dealing with idiosyncrasies as well as teaching social and daily life skills.
I am doing my best to spread Chilean idiosyncrasies through forums, conferences and cultural events."
Intrinsic factors are related to idiosyncrasies of the host's intestinal environment.
PARIS -- In patients with paracoccidioidomycosis, hepatic toxicity with long-term use of ketoconazole is more an issue of patient idiosyncrasies than it is of longevity of use, Dr.
The optimal pacing strategy, then, is to run nearly even splits, taking into account the idiosyncrasies of the course you'll be running.
Whereas some soot and particulate matter (PM) analyses are performed according to agreed-upon standards, others are not, he says, and the physical and chemical idiosyncrasies of different soots can bias many analytical methods.