ideology

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ideology

 [i″de-ol´o-je, id″e-ol´o-je]
1. the science of the development of ideas.
2. the body of ideas characteristic of an individual or of a social unit.

i·de·ol·o·gy

(ī'dē-ol'ŏ-jē, id-ē-),
The composite system of ideas, beliefs, and attitudes that constitutes an individual's or group's organized view of others.
[ideo- + G. logos, study]

i·de·ol·o·gy

(ī'dē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The powerful and authoritative messages communicated through language or culture that tell us who we are and how we are to behave.
[ideo- + G. logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
The notion of Russianness is rather ambiguous among official ideologists, but this could also be said, at least judging from Laruelle's narrative, about some of the forces of the opposition.
In its initial state, the economic policy of the peasant ideologists was based on giving up the liberal economic nationalism, and opening the gates for foreign capital; later, after the first governing, faced with economic realities, they would promote protectionist policies.
This left the case to be hijacked by the so called "Conflict Resolution" studies and implementation ideologists, which complicated more than it is needed, as there are interest groups who does not want this problem solved once and for all.
but of course, when the lives of individuals and communities are controlled by powers that themselves remain uncontrolled--slavers, czars, fuhrers, first secretaries, marshals, generals and generalissimos, ideologists of dictatorships at either end of the spectrum--then creative energy becomes a protest.
Baeumler was not alone among Nazi ideologists in drawing on Nietzsche--the philosopher Martin Heidegger shared his view for a time--but some sharply criticized the practice.
The direction of the Chinese Communist Party may seem opaque to us outsiders, but to the party's ideologists, it's simplicity itself.
New Labour ideologists are out to destroy what remained of economically viable rural life at the end of the Industrial Revolution and the mass migration of workers to towns.
By exploiting the sex-related issues as a political weapon and by appointing themselves as the custodians of the classroom, the radical ideologists are eager to impose their narrow views on the rest of society.
Feinstein attacks both the apartheid ideologists and policymakers of the post-World War II decades and their radical critics, who argued that racial separation and continued underpayment of black labor were conducive to or even necessary for the further development of capitalism in South Africa.
They emphasize the rebelliousness of the Afrikaner or explore the establishment of new Afrikaner identities, different from that constructed by the apartheid ideologists. In diverse cases, for instance with Williams and Naude, the war is a pretext to consider its impact on the post-war and post-apartheid periods.
The Iraqi war destroyed a country and divided a nation, which made the antagonism towards the US and its allies mushroom throughout the region, giving rise to radical Islamic ideologists. The Americans have let go of the fairy tale that says, "Terrorists hate us not for what we've done, but for what we stand for." Americans may see themselves as a good and civilizing force, but the oppressed populations in Iraq, who see their civilians getting abused, tortured and killed under US foreign policy, do not agree.
The notion of an "Enlightenment party" consisting of especially clever people in the vanguard of history is something shared, through late modernity, by journalists and ideologists alike.