ideology

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ideology

 [i″de-ol´o-je, id″e-ol´o-je]
1. the science of the development of ideas.
2. the body of ideas characteristic of an individual or of a social unit.

i·de·ol·o·gy

(ī'dē-ol'ŏ-jē, id-ē-),
The composite system of ideas, beliefs, and attitudes that constitutes an individual's or group's organized view of others.
[ideo- + G. logos, study]

i·de·ol·o·gy

(ī'dē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The powerful and authoritative messages communicated through language or culture that tell us who we are and how we are to behave.
[ideo- + G. logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
While those who played politics on these respective ideologies in past had damaged it.
This article adds to this literature by focusing on the changes we observe in party ideologies with respect to foreign policy.
Ideologies can be classified in three forms vis-a-vis foreign policy.
1) Doxical Superstructure (DS) is formed by values in fact, political and religious ideologies and culture of a human society in a certain historical time.
While manifesto-based ideology indexes account for time-varying ideology, our index does not capture the fact that right- and leftwing ideologies have, undoubtedly, evolved through time.
In The Principle of Hope Bloch conforms more readily (than his early Spirit of Utopia) to Marx's dictum that "Ideologies as the ruling ideas of an age, are [...] the ideas of the ruling class" (Bloch, The Principle of Hope 150).
Movements may stem from ideologies that stress racial superiority, fanatic religious beliefs or radical political views.
All the different secular ideologies failed us badly because the human character dominated, managed and corrupted them after some time.
Downs however asserts that ideologies can frequently be weakly integrated, offering as argument the fact that they are built to attract a plurality of social groups (26).
In the Gender Role Strain Paradigm, the acquisition of gender roles is thought not to be an invariant process leading to the development of clusters of sex-typed personality traits that reside in individuals (as was thought in the older, personality trait-oriented, Gender Role Identity Paradigm; Pleck 1981,1995), but rather is conceptualized as a variable process, strongly influenced by prevailing gender ideologies, which themselves vary according to social location and cultural context.
Over the past decade, there have appeared a wide range of studies, ranging from the medical profession to social work, that have examined the process of professionalization as an articulation of a middle-class identity and as a strategic deployment of ideologies of science.
Apple has expanded and reworked the original interview in keeping with the heavily theoretical tone of the volume, but the conversational and interactive format yields a less complex examination of how neo-liberal, neo-conservative, fundamentalist, and marketplace ideologies are shaping education today.