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identity

 [i-den´tĭ-te]
the aggregate of characteristics by which an individual is recognized by himself and others.
disturbed personal identity a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the inability to distinguish between the self and nonself.
gender identity a person's concept of himself or herself as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, usually based on physical characteristics, parental attitudes and expectations, and psychological and social pressures. It is the private experience of gender role.

i·den·ti·ty

(ī-den'ti-tē),
The summation of a person's internalized history of relationship with objects, his or her social role, and his or her perception of both; the experience of "I". See: ego.
See also: persona, shadow (2).

identity

Psychiatry A person's global role in life and perception of a sense of self. See Core identity, Gender identity Social medicine A sense of individuality including one's distinct personality, talents, abilities, and flaws.

i·den·ti·ty

(ī-den'ti-tē)
1. The sum of characteristics by which a person is recognized (by self and others).
2. A composite definition of the self that includes an interpersonal aspect (e.g., roles, relationships); an aspect of possibility or potential (i.e., who one might become) and a values-oriented aspect that provides a basis for choices and decisions, including self-esteem and self-concept, both in reflecting and being influenced by the society in which one functions.

i·den·ti·ty

(ī-den'ti-tē)
Summation of a person's internalized history of relationship with objects, his or her social role, and his or her perception of both; the experience of "I."
References in periodicals archive ?
* Assess the Identity Theft Protection Services production processes, major issues, and solutions to mitigate the development risk.
There are at least four different sorts of US state laws in effect that are intended to reduce, or mitigate the consequences of, PII compromise and identity theft: data breach notification laws, data disposal laws, identity theft laws, and consumer report security freeze laws.
"The impact of identity theft can be devastating and long-lasting, impacting the victim's financial wellbeing in many ways, ranging from bad credit to outright bankruptcy.
Tax-related identity theft. This occurs when thieves obtain a taxpayer's identity to obtain a bogus tax refund.
While the financial losses from identity theft are significant and the economic effects are far-reaching, the socio-psychological harm to victims is incalculable.
According to the Federal Trade Commission, the share of identity theft due to bank fraud and credit card fraud has steadily increased (Consumer Sentinel Network).
In addition, taxpayers should file a report with their local police department, report the identity theft to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), contact one or more major credit bureaus to place a fraud alert on their records, close any accounts opened fraudulently, and make their banks, lenders, and credit card providers aware of the situation.
There's more at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the World Privacy Forum websites, and providers of identity theft coverage will have additional helpful suggestions.
The report also claimed that teens are particularly vulnerable to identity theft because their credit histories go unmonitored for long periods of time.
A big problem is that identifiers, such as federal IDs or employer identification numbers, are readily available in public records, dumpsters, or internally at banks and other creditors-which makes the ease of access to these numerical identifiers a catalyst for business identity theft. Business identity theft perpetrators are often former employees or current employees with direct access to the books and other forms of financial documentation.
The chart below shows the various types, and relative percentages of identity theft. Credit-related fraud the red section, 20 percent, is the one most people are familiar with, where someone steals your credit card information and starts making purchases without permission.
Sixty percent of businesses that experience identity theft fail within one year of the crime, according to the Florida Department of State's Division of Corporations.

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