identity crisis


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crisis

 [kri´sis] (pl. cri´ses) (L.)
1. the turning point of a disease for better or worse; especially a sudden change, usually for the better, in the course of an acute disease.
2. a sudden paroxysmal intensification of symptoms in the course of a disease.
addisonian crisis (adrenal crisis) the symptoms accompanying an acute onset or worsening of addison's disease: anorexia, vomiting, abdominal pain, apathy, confusion, extreme weakness, and hypotension; if untreated these progress to shock and then death.
aplastic crisis a sickle cell crisis in which there is temporary bone marrow aplasia.
blast crisis a sudden, severe change in the course of chronic granulocytic leukemia, characterized by an increased number of blasts, i.e., myeloblasts or lymphoblasts.
catathymic crisis an isolated, nonrepetitive act of violence that develops as a result of intolerable tension.
celiac crisis an attack of severe watery diarrhea and vomiting producing dehydration and acidosis, sometimes occurring in infants with celiac disease.
developmental crisis maturational crisis.
hemolytic crisis an uncommon sickle cell crisis in which there is acute red blood cell destruction with jaundice.
hypertensive crisis dangerously high blood pressure of acute onset.
identity crisis a period in the psychosocial development of an individual, usually occurring during adolescence, manifested by a loss of the sense of the sameness and historical continuity of one's self, confusion over values, or an inability to accept the role the individual perceives as being expected by society.
life crisis a period of disorganization that occurs when a person meets an obstacle to an important life goal, such as the sudden death of a family member, a difficult family conflict, an incident of domestic violence (spouse or child abuse), a serious accident, loss of a limb, loss of a job, or rape or attempted rape.
maturational crisis a life crisis in which usual coping mechanisms are inadequate in dealing with a stress common to a particular stage in the life cycle or with stress caused by a transition from one stage to another. Called also developmental crisis.
myasthenic crisis the sudden development of dyspnea requiring respiratory support in myasthenia gravis; the crisis is usually transient, lasting several days, and accompanied by fever.
oculogyric crisis a symptom of an acute dystonic reaction in which the person demonstrates a fixed gaze, usually upward; also, the uncontrollable rolling upwards of the eye. It can be a result of encephalitis or a reaction to antipsychotic medications.
salt-losing crisis see salt-losing crisis.
sickle cell crisis see sickle cell crisis.
tabetic crisis a painful paroxysm occurring in tabes dorsalis.
thyroid crisis (thyrotoxic crisis) see thyroid crisis.
vaso-occlusive crisis a sickle cell crisis in which there is severe pain due to infarctions in the bones, joints, lungs, liver, spleen, kidney, eye, or central nervous system.

i·den·ti·ty cri·sis

a disorientation concerning one's sense of self, values, and role in society, often of acute onset and related to a particular and significant event in one's life.

identity crisis

n.
A psychosocial state or condition of disorientation and role confusion occurring especially in adolescents as a result of conflicting internal and external experiences, pressures, and expectations and often producing acute anxiety.

identity crisis

Etymology: L, idem, the same; Gk, krisis, turning point
a period of confusion concerning an individual's sense of self and role in society, which occurs most frequently in the transition from one stage of life to the next. It is often expressed by isolation, negativism, extremism, and rebelliousness.

identity crisis

Psychology A conflict in a person's perceived role in society, which may be accompanied by a loss of the sense of self and historical continuity. See Crisis, Psychosocial development.

i·den·ti·ty cri·sis

(ī-den'ti-tē krī'sis)
A disorientation concerning one's sense of self, values, and role in society, often of acute onset and related to a particular and significant event in one's life.

i·den·ti·ty cri·sis

(ī-den'ti-tē krī'sis)
Disorientation concerning one's sense of self, and role in society, often of acute onset.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Erikson, an identity crisis is a time of intensive analysis, introspection and exploration.
have been going through the most embarrassing public identity crisis since Anne Heche couldn't decide if, when it came to the bedroom, she preferred surf or turf.
THIRTEEN YEARS AFTER ITS BALLYHOOED emergence in San Diego and Tijuana, "inSite" is approaching art-world adolescence and, like many confused, hormone-addled young adults, finds itself experiencing both a growth spurt and something of an identity crisis.
Noel said: "Custard is a fluid with an identity crisis and the workshop explains the reasons behind this as well as the importance of other fluids such as quicksands and slimes.
The strength of this festival is that it manages to be a number of different things while not seeming to suffer from any kind of identity crisis.
However, when the second city's most prolific novelist is accorded a sex change by the careless mis-spelling of his first name and an an identity crisis by an unwarranted hyphen between his second and third names, it can only be concluded that London reporters are not the only ones who should get out more.
Says Harrington, "I'm resigned to going through the identity crisis of not being a dancer any more, and letting the big 'RH' go.
For Acura, which has had a longstanding identity crisis as to whether it should be a luxury or performance marque, SH-AWD clearly tips the scales toward performance.
This identity crisis, together with the massacres in the Middle East in March and April 2002 and my unsorted attachment to a friend back home, put me on the edge of depression.
Then we see how he caught the attention of James Weldon Johnson and moved into the ultimate black arena, the NAACP, which, ironically enough, was going through its own identity crisis and racial power struggles.
The field's identity crisis did not dampen the enthusiasm of the more than 185 participants at Metabolic Profiling: Applications to Toxicology and Risk Reduction, a conference held 14-15 May 2003 at the NIEHS in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.
The personal identity crisis has given rise in recent years to a multitude of publications (for a synthesis, see Dubar, 2000).