identity

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identity

 [i-den´tĭ-te]
the aggregate of characteristics by which an individual is recognized by himself and others.
disturbed personal identity a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the inability to distinguish between the self and nonself.
gender identity a person's concept of himself or herself as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, usually based on physical characteristics, parental attitudes and expectations, and psychological and social pressures. It is the private experience of gender role.

i·den·ti·ty

(ī-den'ti-tē),
The summation of a person's internalized history of relationship with objects, his or her social role, and his or her perception of both; the experience of "I". See: ego.
See also: persona, shadow (2).

identity

Psychiatry A person's global role in life and perception of a sense of self. See Core identity, Gender identity Social medicine A sense of individuality including one's distinct personality, talents, abilities, and flaws.

i·den·ti·ty

(ī-den'ti-tē)
1. The sum of characteristics by which a person is recognized (by self and others).
2. A composite definition of the self that includes an interpersonal aspect (e.g., roles, relationships); an aspect of possibility or potential (i.e., who one might become) and a values-oriented aspect that provides a basis for choices and decisions, including self-esteem and self-concept, both in reflecting and being influenced by the society in which one functions.

i·den·ti·ty

(ī-den'ti-tē)
Summation of a person's internalized history of relationship with objects, his or her social role, and his or her perception of both; the experience of "I."
References in periodicals archive ?
A large part of these identities are natural identities.
Unfortunately, the progress of the research on the self and the identity from the psychological perspective continues to suffer from the problems of being unable to fully appreciate Erikson's classification of the three different identities (i.e., ego, personal and social) and to adequately theorize the concept of "social" (Cote & Levine, 2002).
The larger mission of both books is to counter narrow and simple identities, to celebrate a modern world of contact and mixture and diversity in which no culture belongs just to one people or religion or nation.
further emphasized the importance of addressing clients' multiple identities (e.g., gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation) rather than focusing on one aspect in isolation.
Shifting identities in private education: Reconstructing race at/in the cultural center.
For example, an individual could be preoccupied with confirming one identity to the exclusion of other tasks or identities.
Even if individuals experience a form of nonunitary subjectivity that allows them to define their actions as "right," there may be negative consequences for their personal identities. Changes in personal identity might produce self-imposed social isolation.
In the context of an English class confronting Whiteness, we propose that students be encouraged to use such narrative tools to enhance and deepen their understanding of the literature, their identities, and their world-views, in order to uncover the Others who populate their world-views.
Other career counseling interventions that have been recommended in the published literature include that gay men of color have special issues such as multiple identities and special oppression (Pope & Chung, 2000; Pope et al., 1992; Van Puymbroeck, 2002).
This loss of radical individualism has caused many gay and lesbian youths to take on alternate sexual identities that allow for growth and exploration.
Were such critical identities not simultaneously habitable?
To additionally illustrate the nucleotide identities of ORF1 less the capsid sequence, a phylogenetic tree of polymerase sequences of Mc10, C12, and other available strains was developed (Figure 2B).