ideation

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ideation

 [i″de-a´shun]
the formation of ideas or images. adj., adj idea´tional.
suicidal ideation recurring thoughts of or preoccupation with suicide.

i·de·a·tion

(ī'dē-ā'shŭn),
The formation of ideas or thoughts.

ideation

/ide·a·tion/ (i″de-a´shun) the formation of ideas or images.idea´tional

ideation

Psychiatry The collective representation of thoughts and ideas, recalled from memory, or projected into the future, singly or combined. See Paranoid ideation, Suicidal ideation.

i·de·a·tion

(ī'dē-ā'shŭn)
The formation of ideas or thoughts.

ideation

The formation of ideas, thought, the use of the intellect.
References in periodicals archive ?
Factors Related with Suicidal Ideation: In the assessment performed, it was found that suicidal ideation developed in 45 (71.
Comparison of the two groups who did and did not develop suicidal ideation in terms of the scores they obtained from the scales used in the study is shown in Table 3.
Comparison of the Subjects who had Suicidal Ideation without Suicide Attempt and with Suicide Attempt
Our findings suggest a significantly higher rate of depression and suicidal ideation both during pregnancy and postpartum for active-duty women.
The rate of suicidal ideation in the postpartum military population is also much higher than that observed in the nonmilitary population.
communicate ideation about cheating, shoplifting, or making bombs.
Facilitation transforms ideation into behavior that draws criminals closer to acting out their intentions.
1989; Farber, 1994; Lavery, Siegel, Cousins, & Rubovits, 1993), and personal fable ideations, such as "that can't/won't happen to me," and a general underestimation of risk have not been consistently related to risk-taking behavior (e.
Thus, one direction for additional research might be to better test the links between imaginary audience and personal fable ideations and specific, relevant outcome variables, such as social anxiety, patterns of disturbed eating, vandalism, or specific types of risk-taking behavior.
For example, at follow-up the risk for past suicidal ideation was elevated in victim-perpetrators (risk ratio 1.
Regarding age, it has been found that suicidal ideation is more prevalent among older adolescents (Emond et al.
De Man, Leduc, and Labreche-Gauthier (1993) found that adolescents with low self-esteem or a less internal locus of control have higher suicidal ideation and are more likely to commit suicide.