ideational

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i·de·a·tion·al

(ī'dē-ā'shŭn-ăl),
Relating to ideation.

i·de·a·tion·al

(ī'dē-ā'shŭn-ăl)
Relating to ideation.
References in periodicals archive ?
For examples of these projects, too technically and ideationally complex for brief paraphrase, see the description of 'The Rossetti Archive', in McGann, Radiant Textuality, op.
And it is connected ideationally to such foreign manifestations of neo-fascist resurgence as the nearby Tea Party movement's flirting with violence in the United States and further away in the Hungarian Jobbik Party's call to bring back chain gangs for convicts--a policy idea that Tim Hudak picked up in Ontario.
Islamist groups, while effective ideationally, have been pragmatic in their relationship with their respective governments, as explained in Parts Two and Three, and have not challenged them.
81) In this sense, China should eventually accept "the rules of the game not just for instrumental calculations of self-interest, but ideationally, because it accepts the values as valid".
With delusions of international grandeur, Mbeki inherited the mantle, both ideationally and literally, of the Cold War-era Non-Aligned Movement, which despite its lofty, neutralist pretensions was little more than a fellow traveling ally of the Soviet Union.
During those first, optimistic years--after the collapse of the Soviet bloc but before ethnic cleansing and global terrorism painted "globalization" with a darker face--the label was a corollary for American triumphalism, which was celebrated ideationally as the victory of liberal capitalism and even the "end of history.
The Normative Explanation: Is Turkey Ideationally Committed to Promote Dialogue?
From a theodicy that focused primarily on the hymnal addresses of Winter and Nature, Winter--through the revision process--was transformed into an ideationally more complex and multivalent composition as it became part of The Seasons.
51) "CSR appears to treat a particular set of ideationally and culturally rooted values as universal, and while presenting itself as in some ways reformist, in fact reproduces the social, ethical, economic and political norms embedded in the hegemonic form of globalization" (Blowfield in Marques:37)