idealization

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idealization

 [i-de″al-ĭ-za´shun]
a conscious or unconscious mental mechanism in which the individual overestimates an admired aspect or attribute of another person.

idealization

/ide·al·iza·tion/ (i-de″il-ĭ-za´shun) a conscious or unconscious mental mechanism in which the individual overestimates an admired aspect or attribute of another person.

Patient discussion about idealization

Q. When should I stop? As part of my efforts to lose weight, I worked a lot about accepting myself – that less-than-perfect body is also an acceptable option. And now, after losing weight but not reaching my ideal weight, I have these doubts- Should I continue my efforts to lose weight, although I feel good about my self? What do you think?

A. I truly believe that if you are happy with your weight loss, even though you say you have not reached your ideal weight or goal, be proud of who you are and what you have acomplished. There is no such thing as the perfect body image, at least not as far as i'm concerned. I feel that you have to love yourself for what's on the inside because the outside always changes (i.e. age, loss of hair, teeth, etc...) I had gastric bypass in 2005 and lost 90 lbs. I still have not reached my goal of 125-127 lbs. where I used to be 10 years ago, but I love "who" I am today. I am 140 lbs. of fantastic and some days I look at me and feel different but feel blessed that I am healthy and alive...Hope this helps

More discussions about idealization
References in periodicals archive ?
To interpret the profiles in terms of relative contributions of seven individuation dimensions, we used the following criteria: (1) the mean level of the response scale in the six MITA subscales and the EAS Parental Idealisation subscale ((mother's score+ father's score/number of items)/2), with scores between 1.
The second moment, one much more open to idealisation, was 1641 when the constitutional deck-clearing of the Long Parliament's legislation provided "a magnet of social dreams".
I AGREED with Tony Parson's view that men should take responsibility for their children (The Mirror, August 7 and 8), but his idealisation of the "good old days" was laughable.
Edinburgh University expert Natasha Mauthner said: "It's partly to do with the very high expectations and idealisation of motherhood in society.