iconoclast


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iconoclast

Surgery A surgical instrument used for blunt dissection, which may be used below the galea aponeurotica in preparation for scalp reduction-browlift in hair restoration. See Hair replacement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brubaker is correct that the Byzantines, while often referring to "iconoclasts" (eikonoklastai, "icon-smashers"), used a word for the iconoclastic movement (eikonomachia, "fighting against icons") that is more likely "iconomachy" than "iconoclasm" (3-4).
The ability to tame the stress response represents the second great hurdle to becoming an iconoclast. (14) Berns notes that fear causes people to avoid thinking and acting like iconoclasts.
The description of this iconoclast is not altogether unattractive.
Some iconoclasts are born, and others are made, but Bern asserts that through the right types of experiences, less-gifted people can learn to think more like iconoclasts.
TODAY: Uttoxeter 12.30 Iconoclast. Wetherby 1.45 Dzesmin.
In many cases, by accident or design, the iconoclasts muddied the water, confusing veneration of icons with literal worship.
I thought of that half-remembered tableau as I read Marion Elizabeth Rodgers's Mencken: The American Iconoclast, whose dust jacket bears a second subtitle, "The Life and Times of the Bad Boy of Baltimore" Rodgers is the third of a trio of biographers who have published full-length studies of H.
The Lone Star Iconoclast, the one local paper in US President George Bush's hometown of Crawford, Texas, almost went under when it endorsed John Kerry before the election last year.
When the editors of The Lone Star Iconoclast put the finishing touches on the newspaper's September 29, 2004, editorial endorsement of John Kerry for president, we had no premonition that the half-page commentary would ultimately be read by millions of people from throughout the world.
In Reich Of The Black Sun: Nazi Secret Weapons & The Cold War Allied Legend, author and iconoclast Joseph Farrell provides intriguing answers to a series of hitherto unasked questions: Why were the Allies worried about an atom bomb attack by the Germans in 1944?
The line-ups are as follows: January 6, Iconoclast plus The Vears, We See Foxes and The Affection; January 13, Multi Purpose Chemical plus Dead Logic, Auden Primm and The Laze; January 20, Hot Club de Paris plus Steven Kennedy and Vandal in Berlin; January 27, Ecuador plus Victor FME and Mesemenie Boa.
This volume in Longman's Studies in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature begins with a reminder that in her time Elizabeth Barrett Browning 'was considered a shocking poet, a risk-taker, an innovator, a rebel, an iconoclast even'.