ice


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ice

(īs)
n.
1. Something resembling frozen water: ammonia ice.
2. Slang Methamphetamine.
v. iced, icing, ices

ice′less adj.
Cell biology ICE IL-1 beta-converting enzyme A cysteine protease, the activity of which is critical in the induction of apoptosis mediated by the Fas/APO-1 signal transduction receptor. See ICE-like protein
Immunology Immunocapillary electrophoresisDrug slang A regional street term for any cystallized abuse substance—e.g., cocaine, crack cocaine, methamphetamine, smokeable methamphetamine, PCP, MDM
Substance abuse The street name for a smokable, crystalline form of the psychostimulant, d-methamphetamine; IV ice induces an effect similar to IV methamphetamine, and is far more intense than that achieved orally
Complications Pulmonary edema, dilated cardiomyopathy, acute MI, cardiogenic shock, death
Vox populi Diamonds

ice

Drug slang A street term for any cystallized abuse substance–eg, cocaine, crack cocaine, methamphetamine, smokable methamphetamine, PCP, MDM Substance abuse The street name for a smokable, crystalline form of the psychostimulant, d-methamphetamine; IV ice induces an effect similar to IV methamphetamine, and is far more intense than that achieved orally Complications Pulmonary edema, dilated cardiomyopathy, acute MI, cardiogenic shock, death. See 'Designer' drug.

Irido corneal endothelial syndrome; ICE

A type of glaucoma in which cells from the back of the cornea spread over the surface of the iris and tissue that drains the eye, forming adhesions that bind the iris to the cornea.
Mentioned in: Adhesions

Patient discussion about ice

Q. could i be allergic to ice cream? I've been having stomach aches and diarrhea's lately. and it usually comes after eating ice cream. i love ice cream - it'll be a shame if I'll have to stop eating it...

A. I don't know about being allergic to ice cream, but maybe you are Lactose intolerant? i have the same problem - love ice cream, can't digest it. BUT - don't worry! you don't have to stop eating ice cream! all you have to do is take a pill that contains the enzyme that requires to digest milk half an hour before you eat and it'll be O.K! welcome to the family:)

Q. Do you think the sugar in the ice cream might have caused my fibromyalgia? I have had fibromyalgia for 14 years. For many years I ate lots of ice cream. Recently I have begun breaking out in a rash if I eat anything sweet. Do you know why sugar might cause me to break out? Do you think the sugar in the ice cream might have caused my fibromyalgia?

A. Yes, Even Bryers ice cream makes me hurt. I do much better if I avoid highly processed foods. Some nutritionals that I have found to be highly effective in keeping me pain free are:
calcium/magnesium
kelp
cod liver oil
flax seed oil
raw apple cider vinegar


Q. How does ice help a sprained ankle or other injury? While I exercise I often get sprain. I have seen many times that ice is used as a first aid for sprains. How does ice help a sprained ankle or other injury?

A. it does two helpful things- lower the pain (cold can do that) and prevent swelling. the swelling is a body normal reaction that protects the area that was injured. but we would like to avoid it because it'll strain us.

More discussions about ice
References in classic literature ?
Kotuko went out, day after day, with a light hunting-sleigh and six or seven of the strongest dogs, looking till his eyes ached for some patch of clear ice where a seal might perhaps have scratched a breathing-hole.
One night--he had unbuckled himself after ten hours' waiting above a "blind" seal-hole, and was staggering back to the village faint and dizzy--he halted to lean his back against a boulder which happened to be supported like a rocking-stone on a single jutting point of ice. His weight disturbed the balance of the thing, it rolled over ponderously, and as Kotuko sprang aside to avoid it, slid after him, squeaking and hissing on the ice-slope.
They will show him open ice. He will bring us the seal again!" Their voices were soon swallowed up by the cold, empty dark, and Kotuko and the girl shouldered close together as they strained on the pulling-rope or humoured the sleigh through the ice in the direction of the Polar Sea.
There were gullies and ravines, and holes like gravel-pits, cut in ice; lumps and scattered pieces frozen down to the original floor of the floe; blotches of old black ice that had been thrust under the floe in some gale and heaved up again; roundish boulders of ice; saw-like edges of ice carved by the snow that flies before the wind; and sunken pits where thirty or forty acres lay below the level of the rest of the field.
Kotuko laid up a snow-house large enough to take in the hand-sleigh (never be separated from your meat), and while he was shaping the last irregular block of ice that makes the key-stone of the roof, he saw a Thing looking at him from a little cliff of ice half a mile away.
but do you forget that the Nautilus is armed with a powerful spur, and could we not send it diagonally against these fields of ice, which would open at the shocks."
The frozen poles of the earth do not coincide, either in the southern or in the northern regions; and, until it is proved to the contrary, we may suppose either a continent or an ocean free from ice at these two points of the globe."
About ten men mounted the sides of the Nautilus, armed with pickaxes to break the ice around the vessel, which was soon free.
This would give three thousand feet of ice above us; one thousand being above the water-mark.
Now they arrived at the base of a great knob or dome veneered with ice and powdered with snow--the utmost, summit, the last bit of solidity between them and the hollow vault of heaven.
At twelve o'clock, when the sun peeped over the earth-bulge, they stopped and built a small fire on the ice. Daylight, with the ax, chopped chunks off the frozen sausage of beans.
From our new Cape Horn in Denmark, a chain of mountains, scarcely half the height of the Alps, would run in a straight line due southward; and on its western flank every deep creek of the sea, or fiord, would end in "bold and astonishing glaciers." These lonely channels would frequently reverberate with the falls of ice, and so often would great waves rush along their coasts; numerous icebergs, some as tall as cathedrals, and occasionally loaded with "no inconsiderable blocks of rock," would be stranded on the outlying islets; at intervals violent earthquakes would shoot prodigious masses of ice into the waters below.