iatrogenic

(redirected from iatrogenically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to iatrogenically: Iatrogenesis

iatrogenic

 [i-at″ro-jen´ik]
resulting from the activity of a health care provider or institution; said of any adverse condition in a patient resulting from treatment by a physician, nurse, or allied health professional.

i·at·ro·gen·ic

(ī-at'rō-jen'ik),
Denoting response to medical or surgical treatment, usually denotes unfavorable responses.
[iatro- + G. -gen, producing]

iatrogenic

(ī-ăt′rə-jĕn′ĭk)
adj.
Induced unintentionally in a patient by a physician. Used especially of an infection or other complication of treatment.

i·at′ro·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

iatrogenic

adjective Referring to a physical or mental condition caused by a physician or healthcare provider (e.g., iatrogenic disease) due to exposure to pathogens, toxins or injurious treatment or procedures.

iatrogenic

adjective Referring to a physical or mental condition caused by a physician or health care provider–eg, iatrogenic disease, due to exposure to pathogens, toxins or injurious treatment or procedures

i·at·ro·gen·ic

(ī-at'rō-jen'ik)
Denoting response to medical or surgical treatment, as induced by the treatment itself; usually used for unfavorable responses or infections.
[iatro- + G. -gen, producing]

iatrogenic

Pertaining to disease or disorder caused by doctors. The disorders may be unforeseeable and accidental, may be the result of unpredictable or unusual reactions, may be an inescapable consequence of necessary treatment, or may be due to medical incompetence or carelessness. Iatros is the Greek word for a doctor.

Iatrogenic

Referring to injuries caused by a doctor. Nasal trauma may occasionally result from a doctor's examination of the nose or complications from plastic surgery.

iatrogenic

Relating to a disorder induced by the treatment itself. Example: the development of amblyopia in the good eye following occlusion treatment.

i·at·ro·gen·ic

(ī-at'rō-jen'ik)
Denoting response to medical or surgical treatment.
[iatro- + G. -gen, producing]
References in periodicals archive ?
An iatrogenically displaced tooth during extraction is one of seldom anticipated complication of oral surgery.
Though reducing or stopping the corticosteroid medication is the basis of eliminating iatrogenically induced psychiatric, caution is required when it comes to reducing suddenly the dosages of these drugs, mostly in case of patients given maximum dosages a la longue.
Notification and support for people exposed to the risk of Creutzfeldt--Jakob disease (CJD) (or other prion diseases) through medical treatment (iatrogenically) The Cochrane Collaboration.
They may also occur iatrogenically or as a postobstructive lesion due to thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) or chronic use of crutches.4 Atherosclerosis as a cause is very rare.5 Szuchmacher and colleagues reported 2 cases of atherosclerotic aneurysm6, Michalakis and co-authors reported one case5, Neumayer's group reported 2 cases7 and Morris-Stiff et al2 reported one case of atherosclerotic aneurysm of the axillary artery.
(2) The peripheral variant of Tapia syndrome can occur (1) following trauma or endotracheal intubation, (2) in association with a tumor of the parotid gland, or (3) iatrogenically as a result of surgery.
Both medically (iatrogenically) induced death and the medicalisation of death and dying deny the basic existential right asserted by Illich--to die without diagnosis.
In biomedical and popular accounts of hepatitis C, distinctions are frequently made between these two diseases, with the accompanying assumption that the iatrogenically acquired disease involves a form of "innocent" transmission and the disease acquired through injecting drug use is a form of "guilty" transmission.
In 2004, growing concerns led the Food and Drug Administration to place a black box warning on antipsychotic medications that highlighted concerns about iatrogenically induced diabetes.
Money was so optimistic about the role of gender rearing or imprinting that he argued that in cases like John/Joan an "iatrogenically induced homosexuality" could be created by doctors' and parents' psycho-surgical gendering; that is, Joan would eventually be attracted to boys although genetically XY.* In the same vein, Money and Richard Green (later known for The "Sissy Boy Syndrome" and the Development of Homosexuality, 1987) wrote in the 1960's that boyhood effeminacy was a "gender-role disorder" and a warning sign of later homosexuality, which could be prevented by proper coaching in masculinity.
CJD can occur sporadically, or as a genetic disease, or can be transmitted iatrogenically. In 1996, a new human prion disease, variant CJD (vCJD), was first described in the United Kingdom.
"Neonatal brachial plexus injury is not a priori explained by iatrogenically induced excessive traction," they wrote.