iatrogenic


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iatrogenic

 [i-at″ro-jen´ik]
resulting from the activity of a health care provider or institution; said of any adverse condition in a patient resulting from treatment by a physician, nurse, or allied health professional.

i·at·ro·gen·ic

(ī-at'rō-jen'ik),
Denoting response to medical or surgical treatment, usually denotes unfavorable responses.
[iatro- + G. -gen, producing]

iatrogenic

(ī-ăt′rə-jĕn′ĭk)
adj.
Induced unintentionally in a patient by a physician. Used especially of an infection or other complication of treatment.

i·at′ro·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

iatrogenic

adjective Referring to a physical or mental condition caused by a physician or healthcare provider (e.g., iatrogenic disease) due to exposure to pathogens, toxins or injurious treatment or procedures.

iatrogenic

adjective Referring to a physical or mental condition caused by a physician or health care provider–eg, iatrogenic disease, due to exposure to pathogens, toxins or injurious treatment or procedures

i·at·ro·gen·ic

(ī-at'rō-jen'ik)
Denoting response to medical or surgical treatment, as induced by the treatment itself; usually used for unfavorable responses or infections.
[iatro- + G. -gen, producing]

iatrogenic

Pertaining to disease or disorder caused by doctors. The disorders may be unforeseeable and accidental, may be the result of unpredictable or unusual reactions, may be an inescapable consequence of necessary treatment, or may be due to medical incompetence or carelessness. Iatros is the Greek word for a doctor.

Iatrogenic

Referring to injuries caused by a doctor. Nasal trauma may occasionally result from a doctor's examination of the nose or complications from plastic surgery.

iatrogenic

Relating to a disorder induced by the treatment itself. Example: the development of amblyopia in the good eye following occlusion treatment.

i·at·ro·gen·ic

(ī-at'rō-jen'ik)
Denoting response to medical or surgical treatment.
[iatro- + G. -gen, producing]
References in periodicals archive ?
The specimens were bisected through the tract in which the iatrogenic material was inserted or injected.
The injuries due to trauma were more frequent in males, on the right side, and in the military population, while iatrogenic injuries were more common in females, on the left side, and in the civilian population.
The present case report describes LPD of iatrogenic origin following laparoscopic extirpation of the uterus using a power morcellator in a woman with a normal level of estrogen.
Myringoplasty is a commonly used and simple type of middle ear surgery associated with a low risk of postoperative, iatrogenic EAC cholesteatoma.
Biliary cardiac Tamponade as a Result of Iatrogenic Biliary-Pericardial Fistula.JVIR.
Zainuddin, "Iatrogenic ureter injuries: eleven years experience in a tertiary hospital," Medical Journal of Malaysia, vol.
In this in vivo study, we used a method that simulated iatrogenic colonic perforations during diagnostic colonoscopy to form 1.2-1.5 cm colon perforations in porcine models.
Thus, in cases where there is suspicion of iatrogenic coronary artery dissection, we strongly recommend IVUS as an important adjunct to achieve high technical success rate while treating such complex lesions.
Caption: Figure 2: Horizontal CT scan demonstrating hemoperitoneum from iatrogenic spleen injury.
We suggest that the PFA damage was iatrogenic due to overpenetration when drilling the distal locking hole, since drilling was guided but not guarded.
Conclusion: Iatrogenic acute kidney damage is a major cause of morbidity in experimental animals exposed to such nephrotoxic drugs like amphotericin B and cyclosporine, used either alone or in combination.
He was lead author of a recent Spanish multidisciplinary consensus report on iatrogenic hyperprolactinemia secondary to antipsychotic agents.