iatrogenesis


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Related to iatrogenesis: iatrogenic, iatrogenic illness

iatrogenesis

(ī″a-trō-jen′ĕ-sĭs) [ iatro- + genesis]
Any injury or illness that occurs because of medical care. Some examples: chemotherapy used to treat cancer may cause nausea, vomiting, hair loss, or depressed white blood cell counts. The use of a Foley catheter for incontinence can create a urinary tract infection and urinary sepsis. In the U.S., , 0.67% of patients admitted to a hospital die because of health care associated error.iatrogenic (-jen′ĭk), adjective

cascade iatrogenesis

A treatment that worsens a patient's clinical condition, resulting in further treatment that produces more undesirable effects.
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(Disability as iatrogenesis. In Learning opportunities: educational activities for students with difficulties and disabilities) Campinas: Alinea.
The innovative practitioner should therefore develop new ways of maintaining a good patient-professional relationship without risking the patient's rights to healthcare and thus leading to social iatrogenesis.
This negates the very reasons they exist - to promote, protect and improve people's health - and is perhaps the supreme example of cultural iatrogenesis. Globally, it vindicates Ivan Illich's famous 1975 indictment that 'The medical establishment has become a major threat to health'.
Schimmel (2003) noted that approximately 20% of patients admitted to a university hospital suffered some sort of iatrogenesis (1), a fifth of which had resulted in serious complications.
Iatrogenesis, the name for this new epidemic, comes from iatros, the Greek word for 'physician', and genesis, meaning 'origin'.
Rising rates of surgical intervention in childbirth (Kildea, Pollock and Barclay, 2008; Smith, Plaat and Fisk, 2008; Newman and Hancock, 2009b) provides evidence to suggest the effects of both clinician and professionally initiated iatrogenesis and social and cultural iatrogenesis in childbirth in Australia has burgeoned over the past thirty years (Hamer, 2007; De Costa, 2008; Newman, 2008c; Reiger, 2011).
The first principle of healing is to avoid iatrogenesis. But what helps one patient may harm another--most treatments we apply present potential hazard.
A Case of Cascade Iatrogenesis." Annals of InternalMedicine 137 (5, part 1): 327-33.
His particular interests in forensic medicine concentrated on iatrogenesis, and valuable guidelines on how to avoid therapeutic mishaps are still valid.
In this article as in my recent textbook, the term "chronic hypertension" refers to the 90% of all hypertension cases labeled as "primary" or "essential" or "idiopathic" hypertension, i.e., those that lack any routine "medical" cause, such as hypercalcemia, hyperaldosteronism, aortic coarctation, renovascular disease, renal parenchymal disease, systemic sclerosis, drug iatrogenesis, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.
One such is the concept of iatrogenesis (Illich, 1991), which refers to the way in which medical diagnosis and treatment can sometimes aggravate illness or injury or lead to other disorders.
Are bad outcomes from questionable clinical decisions preventable medical errors?: a case of cascade iatrogenesis. Ann Intern Med.