i.e.


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i.e.

That is.
[L. id est]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ten (10%) percent of the total of items in Article 26.2.1 and 26.2.5 (i.e., the seven (7) direct cost categories, excluding all insurances required by Schedule A) as compensation for overhead except that no percentage for overhead will be allowed on payroll taxes or on the premium portion of overtime pay or on sales and personal property taxes.
Exchange log files, normally accessed sequentially, can be placed on simple mirrored disks (i.e., RAID-1).
To be more specific, she investigates all available legal documents from three, five-year sample sets (i.e., 1540-44, 1590-94, & 1640-44).
Some students reported that there should be a better variety of healthy food (i.e., fresh vegetables) available at the dinning hall and throughout campus.
If required, eliminate the requirement to "attach schedules." Alternatively, reduce the schedule to presentation of control balances (i.e., total assets) only.
Your OMRA ARD must be set for day 8, 9 or 10 after all therapy ends, i.e., day 21, 22 or 23.
These differences exist in all aspects of CSOM, including prevention (i.e., treatment of acute otitis media), topical therapy and other drug regimens, and pre-, intra-, and postoperative antibiotic regimens.
However, measured over the weapon system life cycle, logistics cost (i.e. follow-on support such as replenishment spares and repair) increases to 60-70 percent of the original weapon system cost.
* Education (i.e., Title I Program, Special Education, Indian Education).
Most provocative is the way they promulgate the Minimalist notion of sculpture as a thing in the world, rather than a thing apart; following Morris, Judd, et al., Pardo fathoms art as the occasion for encounter (i.e., questions), rather than the generic stuff of aesthetic experience (i.e., self-sufficient answers).
Chapters 16-17 focus on nineteenth-century European-Americans of Protestant heritage: the "alternative religions" (Shakers, the Oneida Community, Mormons, and Christian Scientists) and the nineteenth-century "feminist critique of religion." Chapters 18-20 examine women's religious leadership in the twentieth century with a chapter on "mainline" traditions (i.e., "mainline Protestants" and the "less traditional branches of Judaism"), the "ambivalent" traditions ("conservative Protestants"), and traditionalist traditions (i.e., Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, Orthodox Jews, and some Protestants).
But in any case, the real difference for Machiavelli, we are told, is not between regimes, but between "humors" (rulers and ruled); republics also spawn princes, and all political men (i.e., all princes) are driven by the same motivation, necessity.