hysteric


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hys·ter·ic

, hysterical (his-ter'ik, his-ter'i-kăl),
Relating to or characterized by hysteria. See: conversion.

hysteric

(hĭ-stĕr′ĭk)
n.
A person suffering from hysteria. No longer in clinical use.

hysteric

[hister′ik]
Etymology: Gk, hystera, womb
pertaining to or resembling hysteria. Also called hysterical.

hysteric

, hysterical (hĭ-stĕr′ĭk)
Pert. to hysteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Matheme in which the hysteric $/S1/S2/a becomes posthysteric a-$-S2-S1
Sigmund Freud visited the Salpetriere and attended Charcot's clinical demonstrations, later developing his theories of the unconscious, the libido, and transference through his own work with hysterics in Vienna.
The figure of the hysteric also reveals that the female body is not necessarily always a powerful source of feminine jouissance.
Just as Irigaray says of the hysteric, "the 'I' is empty still, ever more empty, opening wide in rapture of soul.
Charcot's concern, in the name of scientific objectivity, is to undermine such gender prejudices, but in doing so he replaces one powerfully prescriptive image of the male hysteric with another.
Lacan would be closer to the hysteric because of his own fondness for poetry.
In The Newly-Born Woman, Clement sees the hysteric as "antiestablishment and conservative at the same time.
Alongside each of my photographs appears a text panel with the "chatter" of Augustine the hysteric and the chatter too of Charcot and Didi-Huberman.
The Salpetriere hysterics were coerced to pose for Charcot or face exile to the general asylum, where conditions were significantly harsher, while for performers such as Apple, who are deemed "unstable" by the court of popular opinion (as hostilely misogynist as that is), the conditions under which they acquiesce--or don't--to the use of their likenesses are far more ambiguous.
The Aloud star was in hysterics as she cosied up to new boyfriend Tre Holloway in the back of a cab.