hysteric


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hys·ter·ic

, hysterical (his-ter'ik, his-ter'i-kăl),
Relating to or characterized by hysteria. See: conversion.

hysteric

(hĭ-stĕr′ĭk)
n.
A person suffering from hysteria. No longer in clinical use.

hysteric

, hysterical (hĭ-stĕr′ĭk)
Pert. to hysteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Matheme in which the hysteric $/S1/S2/a becomes posthysteric a-$-S2-S1
Nicknamed the "Caesar of the Salpetriere," the "Napoleon of Neuroses," Char cot at first had little interest in hysteria, which he deemed an illness for family doctors or alienists; it was only when the hospital was restructured that he took on the hysterics. His insistence on clinical observation and detailed patient dossiers led him to identify four distinct phases of hysteria and to define it "not [as] madness or malingering" but as an inherited neurological disorder (21).
Through postmortems of diagnosed hysterics, Charcot hoped to demonstrate that the disease was linked to anatomical lesions or tumors, although these were never found.
Firstly, Dora's memories are given visual form through still and filmic projections and textual form through the projection of written text; and secondly, the hysteric's gaps in memory and loss of speech are countered by the memory and language of the body.
The Hysteric's Revenge successfully combines cultural history with literary criticism.
Beloved's love of sugar thus exemplifies Elizabeth Bronfen's asser tion that hysteria is a form of self-fashioning in which hysteric strategies of self-representation imitate the culture that produces hysterical symptoms (44).
That hypnosis could successfully bring repressed/"hidden" personalities to the surface in hysterics allowed James to take his ideas further and to speculate that perhaps hypnosis could actually induce telepathic communication between the selves.(5) Though unconscious, the well of memories within the "other" selves greatly influences the thought processes and behavior of the "primary" self, and these memories are sometimes expressed in instances of automatic writing.
She cannot escape the haunting memories of the past, which she rehearses continuously like a text-book case of hysteria: "The hysteric resumes and assumes the memories of others.
It is striking that in the end Emma falls out of her hysteric spinning around the gap of insufficiency not owing to the fatality of love, which always remained something phantasmic, intangible, deferred, but rather owing to the facticity of her debt.
In this piece, Lacan connects the "organmorphic symbolism" of hysteric symptoms with the experience of the fragmented body of the mirror-stage ("La famille" 75).
The Hysteric's Revenge examines writers who for the most part regarded themselves as antifeminist, but whose novels support values that today we would promptly recognize as feminist.
Old-fashioned vibrators used as cures for hysterics.