hysteresis

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Related to hysteretic: Hysteresis loop, Hysteresis loss

hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hysteresis

/hys·te·re·sis/ (his″tĕ-re´sis) [Gr.]
1. a time lag in the occurrence of two associated phenomena, as between cause and effect.
2. in cardiac pacemaker terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing.

hysteresis

[his′tərē′sis]
Etymology: Gk, hysterein, to be late
1 a lagging or retardation of one of two associated phenomena or a failure to act in unison.
2 the influence of the previous condition or treatment of the body on its subsequent response to a given force, as in the elastic property of a lung. At any given lung volume the elastic recoil pressure within the airways during expiration is less than that which exists at the same lung volume during inspiration.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hysteresis (histerē´sis),

n a physical phenomenon whereby a material such as a reversible hydrocolloid passes from a solid to a gel state at one temperature and a gel to a solid state at another.

hysteresis

the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The numerical infiltration model of a hysteretic flow requires knowledge of both wetting and drying boundaries, which are basically never available in the field.
decreased and the average speed of propagation increased with a rise of the wave amplitude just in the similar manner as the nonlinear hysteretic piano hammer model predicts.
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The good hysteretic properties of BR are evident in the increased rebound.
We have preliminary data that further repeated elongation does not lead to any significant increase, if at all, in the transient hysteretic deformation.
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In general, higher molecular weight polymers are less hysteretic because there are fewer elastically ineffective chain ends (refs.