hysteresis

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Related to hysteretic: Hysteresis loop, Hysteresis loss

hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
References in periodicals archive ?
The main results of the analysis were the hysteretic curves, cracking patterns, and displacement profiles.
Figures 29 and 30 exhibit the comparisons of the model results and experimental results of the hysteretic behavior and skeleton as well as the failure pattern of HFRC beam-column joints.
Xiu, "Hysteretic modeling based on the hysteretic chaotic neural network," Neural Computing and Applications, vol.
In addition to the above features, TGR displays unusual full time courses of enzyme activity at moderate or high concentrations of GSSG [5, 14-17], which have been considered as hysteretic behavior [5, 14].
Figure 1 presents quarter-car model with a single degree-offreedom and hysteretic nonlinear damping.
The hysteretic components of all 13 measured ascending SHLCs are represented in Fig.
This paper presents design options for implementing a thermal shutdown circuit with hysteretic characteristic, which has two features not provided by similar circuits reported in the literature: a programmable activation temperature and a hysteresis width largely insensitive to the actual value of the activation temperature and to variations of the supply voltage.
The input-output hysteretic behavior of normalized Bouc-Wen model is shown in Figure 2.
As shown, a little difference can be found between the hysteretic curves of the two models.
InnoSwitch-CP ICs incorporate a comprehensive suite of advanced protection features including: OVP; output OCP with 3 V auto restart; hysteretic thermal shutdown and line input overvoltage protection with accurate brown-in/brown- out thresholds.
The energy that is not recovered is attributed to viscous (or hysteretic) losses in the viscoelastic rubber compound and results in a frictional force.
This problem is clarified in [6], where using the nonlinear hysteretic hammer model it was shown [7,8] that the bulk bass hammer, which is relatively light compared to the string mass, may lose the contact with a string due to only the hammer elasticity and without the assistance of waves travelling along the string.