hysteresis


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hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
References in periodicals archive ?
Figures 1 and 2 show the primary hysteresis system containing NES and a piezoelectric element.
(7) Children tend to have high hysteresis (around 12mlnHg), (8,9) and multiple groups have found that CH does decrease slightly with age.
The performance of the grid connected PV system with shunt active power filter is analyzed using Hysteresis Current Controller technique for minimizing harmonics, in the grid connected PV system.
[F.sub.HmaxW] : initial gradient of the hysteresis converted to wheel center position
For example, the nonlinear magnetic problems are analyzed using the finite element method in one dimension [11-13] and two dimensions [14,15], with the use of scalar hysteresis models.
Based on [27], we use RSRP with hysteresis for UE to determine whether it would trigger handover, and in the meantime, to avoid too early or late handover by considering the UE's velocity.
The anomalous hysteresis in the C-V and G-V curves disappeared completely at higher temperatures (Figure 2).
With the excitation voltage increasing and decreasing, the phenomenon of hysteresis is becoming more and more serious.
During the process of cyclic loading and unloading, the area of the hysteresis loop formed indirectly indicates the degree of the rock microcracks opening and closing under cyclic loading.
Tests were carried out systematically increasing and decreasing inlet pressures in order to factor in hysteresis effects.
Hysteresis hinders the applicability of some materials in actuators [10] and also in sensors.