hypovolaemia

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Related to hypovolaemic: hypervolemic

hy·po·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pō-vŏ-lē'mē-ă)
A decreased amount of blood volume in the body.
Synonym(s): hyphemia, hypovolaemia.
[hypo- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]

hypovolaemia

An abnormal reduction in the circulating blood volume from any cause.

hypovolaemia

decrease in the volume of the circulating blood. Under exercise conditions hypovolaemia can develop when the volume of fluid ingested is insufficient to match the sweat loss. See a lso hydration status.

hypovolaemia

; oligaemia reduction in circulating blood volume, due to vasovagal faint, haemorrhage or anaphylaxis; characterized by rise in pulse rate and fall in blood pressure, with increasing blurring of consciousness
References in periodicals archive ?
Beards et al, 1994 Hypovolaemic ICU Colloid bolus given (14), United Kingdom patients, mechanically prior to cardiac ventilated, with output measurements, pulmonary artery then haemodynamic catheter and femoral parameters measured arterial line.
In the situation of hypovolaemic shock, a rapid high-dose IV bolus of oxytocin is contraindicated, but an infusion is essential to contract the uterus.
pericardial tamponade, tension pneumothorax, myocardial injury or dysfunction) and a low central venous pressure (<10 mmHg) is suggestive of hypovolaemic shock, usually from acute ongoing blood loss.
True (A) or false (B): The presence of severe malnutrition may influence the rate of fluid administration in the case of hypovolaemic shock (circulation problems).
While a negligible gradient exists in health, it is an increase in alveolar deadspace in the hypovolaemic trauma patient that contributes to regional ventilation-perfusion mismatch and the observed Pa-etC[O.
The most serious issue remains bleeding during or after CS--deaths of one-third of all mothers during or after a CS are attributed to hypovolaemic shock.
Syncope, hypovolaemic shock and/or anaemia associated with abdominal or back pain are all possible presentations of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).
During the period when tongue swelling was prominent, the patient was managed in a relatively hypovolaemic or euvolaemic state with a central venous pressure of 12 to 16 cm[H.
Children have a greater ability to compensate for trauma-related shock than adults, with hypotension appearing as a late sign of hypovolaemic shock.
Extravasations of plasma may cause hypovolaemia, which may lead to hypovolaemic shock, especially in children.
A circular from the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Health furthermore restricts the use of HES-containing products to specialist anaesthetists, advising the use of Gclofusine for the 'general resuscitation of hypovolaemic patients in intensive care' or for the 'acute resuscitation of patients with severe, source-controlled haemorrhagic shock in theatre by a specialist anaesthetist'.