hypovolaemia


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Related to hypovolaemia: hypervolaemia, hypovolemia

hy·po·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pō-vŏ-lē'mē-ă)
A decreased amount of blood volume in the body.
Synonym(s): hyphemia, hypovolaemia.
[hypo- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]

hypovolaemia

An abnormal reduction in the circulating blood volume from any cause.
References in periodicals archive ?
This accurate, automated real-time replacement reduces the risk of over- or underhydration (i.e., episodic hypovolaemia) relative to standard infusion in the presence of desired high volume diuresis.
Continuous sampling provides an assessment of interventions, such as oxygen therapy and fluid management, to counteract the effects of hypovolaemia on the respiratory system.
A small percentage of patients with unintentional durotomy sustain intracranial haemorrhage, likely due to an alteration in intradural hydrostatic dynamics caused by cerebrospinal fluid hypovolaemia. Despite the gravity of this complication, to our knowledge, only a few cases have been previously documented.
The patient developed acute kidney injury, thought to be due to hypovolaemia and radioiodine use, and was treated with intravenous fluid.
Heat acclimatization elicits adaptations that regulate dehydration and hypovolaemia (Van Kampen, 1981).
However, even with the wealth of information available from observed parameters, the ICU staff commonly deal with difficult questions such as, should an oliguric patient be treated with fluids or with diuretics, and are they suffering from hypovolaemia or fluid overload?
Excessive release of catecholamines from adrenal medulla in response to stimuli such as pain, hypovolaemia and trauma inhibits pancreatic production of insulin and its peripheral activity, leading to hyperglycemia.
The effect of moderate hypovolaemia on microcirculation in healthy older blood donors.
There is another issue touched on by Beaumont Hospital's anaesthesia consultant Michael Power, who states that excesive dehydration can result in serious head injury when a jockey has a fall because it causes a condition called hypovolaemia.
In addition, circulating angiotensin II may also play a role in stimulating thirst and AVP secretion under conditions of severe hypovolaemia. However, of more significance is the role of hypertonicity in controlling thirst and AVP secretion.
In addition to negative effects of mannitol on renal function, it may cause a secondary hypovolaemia due to the osmotic diuretic action (4).
Aggressive diuresis, however, should be avoided as hypovolaemia may cause decreased placental perfusion.