hypovolaemia


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Related to hypovolaemia: hypervolaemia, hypovolemia

hy·po·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pō-vŏ-lē'mē-ă)
A decreased amount of blood volume in the body.
Synonym(s): hyphemia, hypovolaemia.
[hypo- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]

hypovolaemia

An abnormal reduction in the circulating blood volume from any cause.

hypovolaemia

decrease in the volume of the circulating blood. Under exercise conditions hypovolaemia can develop when the volume of fluid ingested is insufficient to match the sweat loss. See a lso hydration status.

hypovolaemia

; oligaemia reduction in circulating blood volume, due to vasovagal faint, haemorrhage or anaphylaxis; characterized by rise in pulse rate and fall in blood pressure, with increasing blurring of consciousness
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a very serious situation with all the necessary triggers for eliciting a pulmonary hypertensive crisis, including hypoxia, oedema, anxiety, anaemia, hypovolaemia and aspiration.
Where clear markers of hypovolaemia are present, colloids appear to be superior to crystalloids for initial resuscitation.
cardiac surgery, orthopaedic surgery or major gastrointestinal surgery) to critically ill patients with sepsis and hypovolaemia.
13] Hypotension commonly results from hypovolaemia and obstructive shock in trauma patients while positive pressure ventilation and excessive amounts of intravenous induction agents [5] have also been implicated.
Hypovolaemia and dehydration, causing peripheral vasoconstriction.
Sepsis-induced hypotension develops from general microcirculatory maldistribution of blood flow and blood volume, and from hypovolaemia due to capillary leakage of intravascular fluid.
Hypovolaemia was therefore not an initiating factor for ARF.
Patients with septic shock release mediators which increase microvascular permeability and produce effusion of fluids and proteins to the interstitial space, causing hypovolaemia, hypoproteinaemia, pulmonary oedema, peripheral oedema and multi-organ failure (1-3).
14) who concluded that, although hypovolaemia and resultant hypotension are infrequently seen in children with severe malaria, impaired tissue perfusion shares features with sepsis syndrome and significantly contributed to deaths.
Hyperosmolar therapy with mannitol, by causing osmotic diuresis, may cause hypovolaemia and result in episodes of arterial hypotension, which have been confirmed to significantly increase mortality in TBI patients (46-49).
Because of their altered physiological response to hypovolaemia, children with haemodynamic instability do not present with typical adult clinical findings, and tachycardia, in the presence of a normal blood pressure, may be the only clinical sign of class III shock.