hypovolaemia


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Related to hypovolaemia: hypervolaemia, hypovolemia

hy·po·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pō-vŏ-lē'mē-ă)
A decreased amount of blood volume in the body.
Synonym(s): hyphemia, hypovolaemia.
[hypo- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]

hypovolaemia

An abnormal reduction in the circulating blood volume from any cause.

hypovolaemia

decrease in the volume of the circulating blood. Under exercise conditions hypovolaemia can develop when the volume of fluid ingested is insufficient to match the sweat loss. See a lso hydration status.

hypovolaemia

; oligaemia reduction in circulating blood volume, due to vasovagal faint, haemorrhage or anaphylaxis; characterized by rise in pulse rate and fall in blood pressure, with increasing blurring of consciousness
References in periodicals archive ?
It is unlikely to be related to the reduced high pressure |15~ and low pressure |16~ baroreceptor sensitivity seen with age as even in healthy young individuals hypovolaemia alone is not a potent stimulus to thirst |13~.
9%) or hypertonic saline (3%) are widely used in clinical practice to treat symptoms of hypovolaemia.
Extravasations of plasma may cause hypovolaemia, which may lead to hypovolaemic shock, especially in children.
It was only during the 1930s that the association was made between a low blood pressure and hypovolaemia following severe injury, the essential intervention being the administration of intravenous fluids.
Problems typically occur shortly after cement insertion; hypotension is common, independent of the anaesthetic technique used and is worsened if there is any degree of hypovolaemia present.
6H refers to hypoxia, hypovolaemia, hydrogen ions (acidosis), hyper- and hypokalaemia, hypothermia, and hypoglycaemia,
Volplex (succinylated gelatin) is given as an intravenous infusion to substitute for blood volume lost by patients suffering from the effects of trauma, surgery or certain medical conditions which result in hypovolaemia (lower than normal blood volume).
Patient's refusal for regional anaesthesia, known allergy to local anaesthetics, pregnant and lactating women, morbidly obese patients and patients having the following: Local infection, severe hypovolaemia, bleeding diathesis and coagulopathy, uncontrolled hypertension and diabetes mellitus, neurological disorders, raised intracranial tension, deformities of spine and hepatic diseases.
Since the completion of the current study, the SZWH has developed a clinical guideline for the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug suppositories in the management of post-partum pain, indicating careful use of these drugs in women with hypovolaemia, pre-eclampsia, gastrointestinal bleeding or ulceration, asthma, allergies to aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or haematological conditions associated with prolonged bleeding time.
The disease is characterised by a diffuse capillary leak with hypovolaemia and acute kidney injury, and a fatal outcome may often be predicted by a persistently low platelet count, elevation of the AST and ALT to > 200 and > 150 IU/L, respectively, and of the aPTT to >60 seconds, and a decrease in the fibrinogen level to < 110 mg/dL.
In these situations, a fine balance must be held between hypovolaemia and fluid overload, both of which may carry severe consequences for an already compromised individual.
More rigorous definitions have evolved over time, and in 2009 the definition of dry weight is "the lowest tolerated postdialysis weight achieved via gradual change in postdialysis weight at which there are minimal signs or symptoms of hypovolaemia or hypervolaemia" (Sinha & Agarwal, 2009, p.