hypothalamic dysfunction


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to hypothalamic dysfunction: hypothalamus, pituitary dysfunction

hypothalamic dysfunction

Endocrinology Any alteration in hypothalamic activity–eg, heart rate, ↑ breathing, ↑ blood flow, dilate pupils.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of obese patients with hypothalamic dysfunction and autonomic alterations.
The increased prevalence of metabolic disorders and CVD could be associated with the extension of large suprasellar tumors to adjacent structures, like the hypothalamus, conditioning a dysregulation in energy balance, disturbed circadian rhythm, sleep irregularities, imbalances in the regulation of body temperature, obesity, heart rate and/or blood pressure imbalance, and feeding alterations due to hypothalamic dysfunction [6-9].
To the Editor: Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) syndrome is a rare disease.
Angelo Pucella, from Bridgend, took part with his wife Beth and son Luca, seven, who is the only person in Wales to suffer from ROHHAD (Rapid-onset Obesity with Hypothalamic dysfunction, Hypoventilation and Autonomic Dysregulation) syndrome.
Luca first showed symptoms of the illness, which is known medically as rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation, at the age of two.
It should be also noted that, in a group of 7 young male patients with genetic hemochromatosis, the normal or high increments of LH after LHRH stimulation suggested that secretion capacity of LH was intact and that hypothalamic dysfunction could be responsible for the observed preclinical gonadal deficiency [49].
While the body's temperature-regulating centers are located in the hypothalamus, it is unlikely that your problem is being caused by hypothalamic dysfunction. Reduced ability to sweat is more likely to be caused by the nerve damage that can accompany diabetes and Parkinson's disease; another, less common cause is Sjogren's syndrome, an immune system disorder.
A 22 year-old woman showed development of persistent Parkinsonian features and hypothalamic dysfunction manifestations after IAE (9).
Hypothalamic dysfunction also results in disordered hunger metabolism and resultant obesity.
Growing evidence suggests hypothalamic dysfunction (Cassidy, Dykens, & Williams, 2000) causes growth hormone deficiency (GHD), short stature, and hypogonadism.
Postoperative endocrine evaluation revealed no hypothalamic dysfunction, and the patient was able to bottle-feed without any signs or symptoms of respiratory distress or nasal airway obstruction.