hypostatic


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hypostatic

 [hi″po-stat´ik]
1. pertaining to, due to, or associated with hypostasis.
2. pertaining to certain inherited traits that are particularly liable to be suppressed by other traits; see epistasis.

hy·po·stat·ic

(hī'pō-stat'ik),
1. resulting from a dependent position.
2. Relating to hypostasis.

hy·po·stat·ic

(hī'pō-stat'ik)
1. Sedimentary; resulting from a dependent position.
2. Relating to hypostasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The disappearance of Transcendence implies the dissolution of the hypostatic law and guarantee which ensured that there would be a just trial on the Day of Judgement.
(25) Rejecting all of the hypostatic terms of person, substance, and nature as distortions or loss of the flowing divine presence, Voegelin found it much truer to reality to understand the impenetrable mystery of the identity of Christ as one who was able to endure the highest possible tension of living fully in the metaxy, in the flux of divine presence, while other human beings have a lesser experience of metaxic tension, and reality.
This understanding of astrology arises out of Bruno's "nova philosophia," which pushed hermetic reason to its furthest degree by disassembling the ontological hierarchy that placed the hypostatic Uno at the highest point of the scale and matter at the lowest.
Though many themes are shared by past and current Christian writers, especially their objection to Baha'i views on the Trinity, resurrection, and the hypostatic union of Christ, more recent writings are marked by an effort not only towards greater historical accuracy but a more thorough attempt at refutation from a Christian viewpoint.
Tennyson's focus (like Lyell's) is the moral, spiritual side of humanity that looks to Christ as an examplar for conduct; yet his voice remains puzzled, especially over the hypostatic union, the way the incarnation unites the natural and supernatural.
There is nothing necessary or hypostatic about souls, much less material bodies or objects: all depend upon a continually active, responsible subject, grammatical as well as moral.
Complications such as hypostatic pneumonia and pressure sores may develop, resulting in accelerated debility.
In it the 'division or confusion in the hypostatic union of the two natures of the person manifested individually' is condemned, a union 'that surpasses understanding and is ineffable and unknowable.
The fragments are then projected onto a hypostatic grid of intelligibility composed of a plane of oppositional threads such as the matter/anti-matter antimony.
For example, Kimberly Benston transforms unnaming into an epistemological condition capable of sustaining an ethics of self-creation, in which "dreams of the hypostatic experience that simultaneously names and unnames itself" resolves into a stance capable of taking "responsibility for the rhythms of self by reconciling them with the intolerable music of [one's] familial past" ("I Yam" 164, 169).
The sacrament, rather than an accident veiling an inward substance or, as for Luther, a consubstantial manifestation of the hypostatic union, is instead an Augustinian seal ratifying a sacramental reality solely in the heart or soul of the communicant.
The volume is divided into eleven chapters that treat the following themes: proofs for God's existence and the divine attributes; religious language; divine knowledge and agency; the Trinity; human nature, including the immortality of the soul and the freedom of the will; predestination and merit; grace and sin; Jesus; the hypostatic union and Christ's saving work; Mary; and the sacraments.