hypostasis


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Related to hypostasis: Ousia

hypostasis

 [hi-pos´tah-sis]
poor or stagnant circulation, often with a deposit or sediment, in a dependent part of the body or an organ.

hy·pos·ta·sis

(hi-pos'tă-sis),
1. Formation of a sediment at the bottom of a liquid.
2. Synonym(s): hypostatic congestion
3. The phenomenon whereby the phenotype that would ordinarily be manifested at one locus is obscured by the genotype at another epistatic locus; for example, in humans, the phenotype for the ABO blood group locus can be expressed only in the presence of its precursor, H substance. The Bombay factor in the homozygous state blocks H formation and obscures the ABO phenotype.
[G. hypo-stasis, a standing under, sediment]

hypostasis

/hy·pos·ta·sis/ (hi-pos´tah-sis) poor or stagnant circulation in a dependent part of the body or an organ.

hypostasis

(hī-pŏs′tə-sĭs)
n. pl. hyposta·ses (-sēz′)
1. Philosophy The substance, essence, or underlying reality.
2. Christianity
a. Any of the persons of the Trinity.
b. The essential person of Jesus in which his human and divine natures are united.
3. Something that has been hypostatized.
4.
a. A settling of solid particles in a fluid.
b. Something that settles to the bottom of a fluid; sediment.
5. Medicine The settling of blood in the lower part of an organ or the body as a result of decreased blood flow.
6. Genetics A condition in which the action of one gene is concealed or suppressed by the action of an allele of a different gene that affects the same part or biochemical process in an organism.

hy′po·stat′ic (hī′pə-stăt′ĭk), hy′po·stat′i·cal adj.
hy′po·stat′i·cal·ly adv.

hy·pos·ta·sis

(hi-pos'tă-sis)
1. Formation of a sediment at the bottom of a liquid.
2. Synonym(s): hypostatic congestion.
3. The phenomenon whereby the phenotype that would ordinarily be manifested at one locus is obscured by the genotype at another epistatic locus.
[G. hypo-stasis, a standing under, sediment]

hypostasis

a relationship between two genes whose products act in the same biochemical PATHWAY, where the functional effect of one gene is masked by another. The enzyme coded by the hypostatic gene operates later in the pathway than the enzyme produced by the epistatic gene. see EPISTASIS.

hypostasis

poor or stagnant circulation in a dependent part of the body or an organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Pamphilus' time trinitarian theology did not distinguish hypostasis and ousia, but the Father and Son were agreed, by the Origenists at least, to be distinct Hypostases.
51) Aristotle's differentiation of primary and secondary substances is, according to Moulder, equivalent to the Chalcedonian formula's distinction between hypostasis or prosopon and physis or ousia.
2) The notion of person, according to Patristics, is based on redefining two terms that played different parts in the vocabulary of the classic period, hypostasis and prosopon.
The Greek terms hypostasis and prosopon both express in general the idea of a "person.
The divine Word, then, is a metonym for God, and is not a hypostasis distinct from the divine.
Al-Kirmani's explanation of the third intelligence is indeed strange, even though incomplete, and may suggest the beginning of a material hypostasis midway in the stream of intelligences.
unfolds the distinctive meanings of Theodore's technical terms (nature, hypostasis, prosopon), in the end it is not the technical language that presents the greatest stumbling block, but the way that Theodore describes the plain activities of Christ in the Gospel.
But part of the poems contain a hypostasis of the female sexual experience in a monogamous setting as the way the relation between devotee and God is described.
starts with critical questions--such as the integral relationship between Wisdom and Spirit Christologies, the proper (as opposed to appropriated) roles of trinitarian persons, divine suffering--and then engages the categories that have both benefited and frustrated the tradition: hypostasis, ekstasis, perichoresis, koinonia, sophia, prolepsis, panentheism.
And christological implications followed: without allegory it became harder to understand how the divine hypostasis was present precisely in, through, and as our humanity, a humanity which must be compounded of the infinite echo-chamber of memory and the manifold resonances of expectation.
But this does not answer the essential question: is Baal Hammon a hypostasis of El, a hypostasis of Baal, a hypostasis of a deity named Hammon (|is less than~ Hammanu), or a title of yet a fourth deity whose "real name" could be known?
Rightly stressing, therefore, that the doctrine of creation throws a gulf between these two contemporaries, Ziebritski also shows, with great acuity, how they differ in their use of the term hypostasis.