hypostasis


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Related to hypostasis: Ousia

hypostasis

 [hi-pos´tah-sis]
poor or stagnant circulation, often with a deposit or sediment, in a dependent part of the body or an organ.

hy·pos·ta·sis

(hi-pos'tă-sis),
1. Formation of a sediment at the bottom of a liquid.
2. Synonym(s): hypostatic congestion
3. The phenomenon whereby the phenotype that would ordinarily be manifested at one locus is obscured by the genotype at another epistatic locus; for example, in humans, the phenotype for the ABO blood group locus can be expressed only in the presence of its precursor, H substance. The Bombay factor in the homozygous state blocks H formation and obscures the ABO phenotype.
[G. hypo-stasis, a standing under, sediment]

hypostasis

(hī-pŏs′tə-sĭs)
n. pl. hyposta·ses (-sēz′)
1. Philosophy The substance, essence, or underlying reality.
2. Christianity
a. Any of the persons of the Trinity.
b. The essential person of Jesus in which his human and divine natures are united.
3. Something that has been hypostatized.
4.
a. A settling of solid particles in a fluid.
b. Something that settles to the bottom of a fluid; sediment.
5. Medicine The settling of blood in the lower part of an organ or the body as a result of decreased blood flow.
6. Genetics A condition in which the action of one gene is concealed or suppressed by the action of an allele of a different gene that affects the same part or biochemical process in an organism.

hy′po·stat′ic (hī′pə-stăt′ĭk), hy′po·stat′i·cal adj.
hy′po·stat′i·cal·ly adv.

hy·pos·ta·sis

(hi-pos'tă-sis)
1. Formation of a sediment at the bottom of a liquid.
2. Synonym(s): hypostatic congestion.
3. The phenomenon whereby the phenotype that would ordinarily be manifested at one locus is obscured by the genotype at another epistatic locus.
[G. hypo-stasis, a standing under, sediment]

hypostasis

a relationship between two genes whose products act in the same biochemical PATHWAY, where the functional effect of one gene is masked by another. The enzyme coded by the hypostatic gene operates later in the pathway than the enzyme produced by the epistatic gene. see EPISTASIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the flesh of the God-Logos did not subsist with its own subsistence, nor has it become another hypostasis in addition to the hypostasis of the God-logos, but it has rather become enhypostatos, subsisting in it [i.e.
This only emphasizes what was stated by the early Great Councils regarding the hypostatic union: that in the Incarnation, a human essence was united to the divine person (hypostasis) of the Word.
The First Hypostasis now would not be the Father, but a congener, of the Second.
It is then that this divine Person, now unknown, not having his image in another hypostasis, will manifest himself in deified persons: for the multitude of the saints will be his image.(25)
However, James Moulder argued that Chalcedonian terminology is permeated by Aristotelian metaphysics.(51) Aristotle's differentiation of primary and secondary substances is, according to Moulder, equivalent to the Chalcedonian formula's distinction between hypostasis or prosopon and physis or ousia.
I, for example, wondered why the Gospel of Thomas and the Gospel of Philip were the chosen representatives of gnostic literature while two other important Nag Hammadi texts, the Apocryphon of John and the Hypostasis of the Archons, were omitted.
Stead), hypostasis; ethical terms,--highmindedness, pride, and courtesy being contributed by the late John Procope.
In particular, Origen's teachings regarding the distinct hypostasis of the Son, the Son's divine nature in relation to the Father, the Son's mediatory role, and the importance of the incarnate Son's freedom would all become reference points for future theologians.
Through Eco's definition, as an anthropologist, the author assumes the necessary reference to alterity, not as a concept, but rather in its social hypostasis. However, the social hypostases do not appear as gross descriptions but rather as accompanied by stereotypes, which are negative (the Other is seen as barbaric, nomadic, tent man, untrained peasant, easterner, wild) or positive (the old Greek, the good wild).
This theme is so central and so drawn out that tora is said to assume "virtually the status of a divine hypostasis, like wisdom (hokma) in Proverbs 8" (p.
This is called the "Hypostatic Union", because the Greek word for "nature" is "hypostasis".
In dealing successively with the themes of God as Begetter and Begotten, Logos and Son, Christ the Lord, and the Holy Spirit, he not only pinpoints the distinctive and very sophisticated theological (defence of a single hypostasis, of the homoousion, of a coequal, coeternal trinity in God) and Christological (Christ as not `mere man' but as Logos and Son from eternity) positions of the author, and his classic critique of and differentiation between Asterius and Eusebius, Marcellus and Photinus, but also hints strongly at the similarities with Apollinarius.