hypostasis

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Related to hypostases: hypostasis, antiphrastical

hypostasis

 [hi-pos´tah-sis]
poor or stagnant circulation, often with a deposit or sediment, in a dependent part of the body or an organ.

hy·pos·ta·sis

(hi-pos'tă-sis),
1. Formation of a sediment at the bottom of a liquid.
2. Synonym(s): hypostatic congestion
3. The phenomenon whereby the phenotype that would ordinarily be manifested at one locus is obscured by the genotype at another epistatic locus; for example, in humans, the phenotype for the ABO blood group locus can be expressed only in the presence of its precursor, H substance. The Bombay factor in the homozygous state blocks H formation and obscures the ABO phenotype.
[G. hypo-stasis, a standing under, sediment]

hypostasis

/hy·pos·ta·sis/ (hi-pos´tah-sis) poor or stagnant circulation in a dependent part of the body or an organ.

hypostasis

(hī-pŏs′tə-sĭs)
n. pl. hyposta·ses (-sēz′)
1. Philosophy The substance, essence, or underlying reality.
2. Christianity
a. Any of the persons of the Trinity.
b. The essential person of Jesus in which his human and divine natures are united.
3. Something that has been hypostatized.
4.
a. A settling of solid particles in a fluid.
b. Something that settles to the bottom of a fluid; sediment.
5. Medicine The settling of blood in the lower part of an organ or the body as a result of decreased blood flow.
6. Genetics A condition in which the action of one gene is concealed or suppressed by the action of an allele of a different gene that affects the same part or biochemical process in an organism.

hy′po·stat′ic (hī′pə-stăt′ĭk), hy′po·stat′i·cal adj.
hy′po·stat′i·cal·ly adv.

hy·pos·ta·sis

(hi-pos'tă-sis)
1. Formation of a sediment at the bottom of a liquid.
2. Synonym(s): hypostatic congestion.
3. The phenomenon whereby the phenotype that would ordinarily be manifested at one locus is obscured by the genotype at another epistatic locus.
[G. hypo-stasis, a standing under, sediment]

hypostasis

a relationship between two genes whose products act in the same biochemical PATHWAY, where the functional effect of one gene is masked by another. The enzyme coded by the hypostatic gene operates later in the pathway than the enzyme produced by the epistatic gene. see EPISTASIS.

hypostasis

poor or stagnant circulation in a dependent part of the body or an organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aquinas on the common inherence of the hypostases, Summa contra Gentiles, iv.
The Arian Eusebius of Caesarea understood and welcomed Constantine's explanation of the word homoousios at Nicaea because this formula was not in contradiction with the "mild subordinationism" implied in his own distinction of the two divine hypostases.
While he attempts to account for the undiminished reality of Christ's human nature by attributing [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in the sense of `existing' or 'real' to both his humanity and his divinity, he is aware that, if the term is taken to denote a hypostasis that subsists on its own, his defence of the [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] fall victim to Severus' accusation of a Nestorian doctrine of two hypostases or prosopa.
2) Although logic leads us to produce hypostases, we--that is, common sense, science, and metaphysics--have the belief that these positings present the actual world; but in doing so, we mistake mere models of actuality, the "metaphysical" worlds, for actual actuality.
The Quatrains of the Beautiful Girl brings forward the variety of feminine hypostases in a Blagian sense.
She not merely steers the dialogue in De beata vita back on track several times when it begins to flounder, but is the one character who at the end recognizes in Augustine's fascinating blend of the Stoic virtues with the Neoplatonic hypostases the triune God, whom she knew and recognized as the God found in Saint Ambrose's hymn, 'Fove precantes, Trinitas'.
In De umbris the description of the way the wheel functions seems to be a restatement of the ascension of the soul through five degrees, which is associated with Ficino's five hypostases in the first books of his Theologia Platonica.
3) As the homoousion came to signify, not merely a community of attributes or nature, but an equality of status between the persons of the Trinity, Origen's theology was denounced by those who believed that he subordinated the other two Hypostases to the First.
338), a critic of some stature in Russia, called upon Soviet writers to turn away from "the socially linear literature of resistance in its liberal and dissident hypostases," to abandon the "mission that literature was obliged to take upon itself in the period of the closed state," and to embrace "the playful element in art.
Les poetes de la famille Vacaresti ont surpris la femme dans des hypostases symboliques sous les influences visibles des preromantiques et des romantiques occidentaux.
As Robert Sinkewicz stated in his commentary on Gregory's later work, The One Hundred and Fifty Chapters, "When Gregory spoke of the energies observed in the three hypostases, he did not neglect to add that in the Godhead these are numerically one, for there is one common energy of the three persons.
It is also widely recognized that the Cappadocian fathers had a foremost role in shaping a theological language that assists in safeguarding that mystery, chiefly by introducing a clear terminological distinction, namely, one ousia and three hypostases.