hypopyon


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hypopyon

 [hi-po´pe-on]
pus in the anterior chamber of the eye.

hy·po·py·on

(hī-pō'pi-on),
The presence of leukocytes in the anterior chamber of the eye.
[hypo- + G. pyon, pus]

hy·po·py·on

(hī-pō'pē-on)
The presence of visibly layered leukocytes in the anterior chamber of the eye.
[hypo- + G. pyon, pus]

hypopyon

A layer of pus cells in the aqueous humour at the bottom of the front chamber of the eye, immediately behind the CORNEA. Hypopyon does not necessarily signify intraocular infection (ENDOPHTHALMITIS) but is often the result of sterile inflammation as in UVEITIS.

Hypopyon

A small amount of pus or collection of white cells that is visible in the front of the eye in severe cases of anterior uveitis.
Mentioned in: Uveitis

hypopyon

The presence of pus in the anterior chamber of the eye associated with infectious diseases of the cornea (e.g. severe microbial keratitis, corneal ulcer), the iris or the ciliary body (e.g. severe anterior uveitis). The pus usually accumulates at the bottom of the chamber and may be seen through the cornea. See hypopyon keratitis; Behçet's syndrome.

hy·po·py·on

(hī-pō'pē-on)
The presence of leukocytes in the anterior chamber of the eye.
[hypo- + G. pyon, pus]
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical Diagnosis: The clinical signs most commonly used to differentiate ulcers were infiltrate border appearance, surrounding stromal haze, and the presence (Or absence) of hypopyon. The same clinical signs were listed as most helpful in the graders' clinical decision the clinical signs noted most often were central location of the infiltrate, the absence of a plaque, well-delineated borders and moderate surrounding stromal haze.
Clinical findings included posterior synechia in 41 patients (22.9%) (Figure 1), presence of fibrin during acute episodes in 36 patients (39.5%), (Figure 2) and hypopyon in 7 patients (3.9%) (Figure 3).
Exam findings in these patients were indicative of active infection including stromal opacification, anterior chamber reaction, and hypopyon. Cultures and diagnostic testing identified various organisms, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acanthamoeba spp., which might suggest contamination of contact lenses and supplies with tap water.
Of the 14 patients enrolled in the study, the satellite lesion in 12 patients and hypopyon in 2 patients disappeared after intrastromal voriconazole, without secondary infection or corneal perforation.
Table 1 Examination of the anterior segment during postoperative review Structure Changes Possible cause Lids and lashes Blepharitis Conjunctiva Injection Infection Oedema Inflammation Reaction to eye drops Cornea Oedema Fluid postop (FED) Mechanical touch during surgery Epitheliopathy Reaction to drops Dry eye Surgical wound leakage Wound not sealed Anterior Cells and flare Inflammation chamber Hypopyon Chronic endophthalmitis (AC) Soft lens material Retained material IOL Haptic in the AC Postop movement of IOL Wrinkled or hazy posterior capsule Iris and pupil Atrophy or tears Mechanical damage (often if iris hooks required for small pupil)
Curth, "Recurrent genito-oral aphthosis and uveitis with hypopyon (Behcet'S syndrome): report of two cases," Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology, vol.
Gabler, "Hypopyon after repeated transplantation of human amniotic membrane onto the corneal surface," Ophthalmology, vol.
Anterior uveitis is the most common serious ocular presentation and can be associated with corneal precipitates and hypopyon. Less commonly, posterior uveitis, retinitis, choroiditis and optic neuritis have been described.
Hypopyon disappeared 1 day after treatment, but fungi were persistent in corneal scrapings 4 days after treatment.
There was no hypopyon, satellite lesion, or endothelial plaque.
Visual acuity is usually good at presentation except in eyes with severe hypopyon [1].
Behcet's disease is a multisystemic, vasculitic, chronic disorder characterized by recurrent oral aftous lesions, iridocyclitis with hypopyon and genital ulcers.