hypopnea


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hypopnea

 [hi-pop´ne-ah]
abnormal decrease in depth and rate of respiration; see also bradypnea and hypoventilation. adj., adj hypopne´ic.

hy·pop·ne·a

(hī-pop'nē-ă), In the diphthong pn, the p is silent only at the beginning of a word. Although hypopne'a is the correct pronunciation, the alternative pronunciation hypop'nea is widespread in the U.S.
Breathing that is shallower or slower, than normal.
Synonym(s): oligopnea
[hypo- + G. pnoē, breathing]

hypopnea

(hī-pŏp′nē-ə, hī′pō-nē′ə)
n.
Abnormally slow, shallow breathing.

hy′pop·ne′ic adj.

hy·pop·ne·a

(hī-pop'nē-ă)
Breathing that is shallower, or slower, than normal.
Synonym(s): oligopnea, hypopnoea.
[hypo- + G. pnoē, breathing]

hypopnea

the decreased ventilation of the lungs.

Hypopnea

Shallow or excessively slow breathing usually caused by partial closure of the upper airway during sleep, leading to disruption of sleep.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders

hy·pop·ne·a

(hī-pop'nē-ă)
Breathing that is shallower or slower than normal.
Synonym(s): hypopnoea.
[hypo- + G. pnoē, breathing]
References in periodicals archive ?
OSAS is a syndrome characterized by recurrent complete (apnea) or partial (hypopnea) episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep, and frequent decrease in blood oxygen saturation (SpO2).
HbA1c is associated with severity of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in nondiabetic men.
Association of tumor necrosis factor-a gene polymorphism (-308) and obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.
* [greater than or equal to] 5 episodes of apnea or hypopnea, or both, per hour of sleep, with symptoms of a rhythmic breathing disturbance or daytime sleepiness or fatigue
They were divided into two groups according to their apnea hypopnea index (AHI).
So every time one of our patients falls asleep they have a short central apnea or hypopnea to let the CO2 build up and every time they arouse, they breathe faster to get rid of the CO 2.
The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) is an index of severity that combines apneas and hypopneas (slow or shallow breathing).
Compared with a quiet sleeper, the so-called simple snorer experiences upper-airway resistance and a reduced airflow but gets more air than a person experiencing sleep apnea or hypopnea does.
Measurement of the number of apnea and hypopnea events per hour, which is called the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), is used to grade OSA (7).