hypoglycaemic drugs

hypoglycaemic drugs

Drugs used in the treatment of Type II (maturity-onset) DIABETES. The term is not normally applied to INSULIN.
References in periodicals archive ?
Findings of this study demonstrated that T2DM patients on a combined therapy of insulin injections and oral hypoglycaemic drugs had significantly higher levels of dyslipidaemia, hypertension and autonomic dysfunction when compared to T2DM patients treated with oral hypoglycaemic drugs alone in spite of having same mean age and duration of the disorder.
Various insulin and oral hypoglycaemic drugs were developed, which were able to achieve euglycaemia.
Long acting hypoglycaemic drugs should be stopped 24 hours before surgery.
Participants were to have had T2D for at least two years, be older than 25 years, and have had hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia at study commencement despite treatment with statins and oral hypoglycaemic drugs for at least three months.
The study subjects comprised of total 30 males and females aged 20 - 55 years and above who are known cases of DM type II on oral hypoglycaemic drugs and non diabetic individuals, taking both the groups in equal numbers.
Effects of Hypoglycaemic Drugs on Bone Metabolism and Fracture Risk
While the potential of oral hypoglycaemic drugs (especially metformin, glibenclamide, and repaglinide) in treating diabetes has well been investigated, there is only little information to support their protection against oxidative stress-induced damage during diabetic complications.
[4] Sulfonylureas have been used in diabetes mellitus for decades and are the most widely used oral hypoglycaemic drugs. [5] They are usually considered as second-line therapy after metformin because they are effective, can lower HbA1c by 1-2%, and are available in inexpensive generic forms.
It is comparatively free of significant side effects and unlike most other oral hypoglycaemic drugs lacks a significant risk of producing hypoglycaemia, which itself can also increase cardiovascular risk.