hypogammaglobulinemia


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hypogammaglobulinemia

 [hi″po-gam″ah-glob″u-lin-e´me-ah]
abnormally low levels of all classes of immunoglobulins, associated with heightened susceptibility to infectious diseases; see also agammaglobulinemia, dysglobulinemia, and immunodeficiency.
common variable hypogammaglobulinemia common variable immunodeficiency.
physiologic hypogammaglobulinemia a normal period of hypogammaglobulinemia seen in all infants at about 5–6 months of age as the level of transplacentally acquired maternal immunoglobulins declines before endogenous immunoglobulin synthesis rises to normal levels.
transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy prolongation of the normal physiologic hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy caused by delayed development of endogenous immunoglobulin production and associated with increased susceptibility to infections.
X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(hī'pō-gam'ă-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă),
Decreased quantity of the gamma fraction of serum globulin; sometimes used loosely to denote decreased quantity of immunoglobulins in general; associated with increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections.
Synonym(s): hypogammaglobinemia

hypogammaglobulinemia

Immunology A gallimaufry of conditions characterized by ↓ production of proteins, usually Igs, which migrate in the gamma region of a protein electrophoretic gel; hypogammaglobulinemia may be congenital, as in Bruton's disease, or other B-cell defects or acquired, as in CLL, and accompanied by monoclonal gammopathies Treatment Human immune globulin. See Immunodeficiency, B cell.

hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(hī'pō-gam'ă-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă)
Decreased gamma fraction of serum globulin; associated with increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections.
Synonym(s): hypogammaglobulinaemia.

hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(hī'pō-gam'ă-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă)
Decreased gamma fraction of serum globulin; associated with increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections.
Synonym(s): hypogammaglobulinaemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differential diagnosis included (a) rituximab-induced hypogammaglobulinemia, (b) unmasking of CVID by rituximab, and (c) lymphoma.
CVID is one of the most frequently occurring types of primary hypogammaglobulinemia, and it is characterized by recurrent infections, autoimmunity, autoinflammatory, or hemophagocytosis syndromes.
Immunological investigations reveal hypogammaglobulinemia with IgA and IgG deficit (Table 2).
Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and the hypogammaglobulinemia are the leading application for IVIG, collectively contributing about 2/5th of the market revenue
HYQVIA was approved in Europe in 2013 for adults ([greater than or equal to] 18 years) with primary immunodeficiency syndromes and myeloma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with severe secondary hypogammaglobulinemia and recurrent infections.
Despite the normal numbers of B lymphocytes, he continues to have hypogammaglobulinemia with low IgG levels and requires monthly IVIG infusions.
What is more, immunosuppressive therapy leads to hypogammaglobulinemia and secondarily induces immune deficiency [23].
Transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy (THI), defined as prolongation of physiological hypogammaglobulinemia normally seen between the initial 3rd and Gth months of life, is one of the most common immune deficiencies of childhood.
The majority of infections were due to upper-respiratory tract and urinary tract infections, possibly associated with secondary hypogammaglobulinemia. The incidence of serious infections (pneumonia, cellulitis, and sepsis) was reported in approximately 2% of rituximab treated patients (vs.1% of controls).
Primary "acquired" hypogammaglobulinemia; clinical and genetic aspects of nine cases.
Nephrotic syndrome in children is an immuno-compromised state due to hypoproteinemia particularly hypogammaglobulinemia (urinary loss and impaired synthesis of IgG, ), decreased complement factor B (C3 proactivator) and D, both being essentials for phagocytosis of encapsulated pathogens.2,3,14,20,22 Furthermore, there is also evidence of abnormal T- lymphocyte function, hypovolemia resulting in hypo-perfusion of spleen and intestinal mucosa leading to hyper-coagulation and micro -infarcts, edematous tissue providing culture medium for bacterial growth.