hypofrontality

hy·po·fron·tal·i·ty

(hī'pō-fron-tal'i-tē),
A decrease in the neuronal activity of various areas of the frontal lobes, arising from various etiologies and associated with a number of clinical symptoms or disorders.

hy·po·fron·tal·i·ty

(hī'pō-frŭn-tal'i-tē)
A decrease in the neuronal activity of various areas of the frontal lobes, arising from various causes and associated with a number of clinical symptoms or disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypofrontality, on the other hand, is often associated with behavioral problems, resulting from the exercise of poor judgment and from impulsivity.
Additions and/or changes to clinical management included: (1) ordering other studies (such as a CT or MRI); (2) addressing newly found medical morbidities (unexpected space occupying lesions, unexpected trauma patterns, unexpected toxicity patterns, unexpected signs of mild cognitive impairment or dementia, unexpected seizure activity, unexpected potential vascular problems); and (3) discovering other target for treatments beyond those defined by the presence of an Axis I, Axis II, Axis III diagnosis, such as hyperfrontality, hypofrontality, cerebellar hypoperfusion, limbic system hyperperfusion, temporal lobe abnormalities and others that were found through the use of SPECT scanning and had not been found or even suspected by the state-of the-art diagnostic evaluation described above.
1%, n = 72) being most common, and hypofrontality of the prefrontal cortex (47.
This reduction in the use of antidepressant medication can possibly be attributed to those patients with hypofrontality patterns who were depressed and taking SSRIs.
2004, 557), a condition referred to as hypofrontality.
29) A Dietrich, 'Functional neuroanatomy of altered states of consciousness: The transient hypofrontality hypothesis', Consciousness and Cognition, vol.
Scans also show if there is hyperfrontality, hypofrontality or significant asymmetries in function.
2004), while hypofrontality is more likely to respond to stimulant medications (Amen, Hanks & Prunella 2008), and patients who are both impulsive and compulsive may need both types of intervention.
Second, because of the hypofrontality associated with depression (Drevets 1997; Buchsbaum 1986), patients could not have met the DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder at the time of their scan, nor could they have received any diagnosis of depression (296.