hypoechoic

hypoechoic

 [hi″po-ĕ-ko´ik]
in ultrasonography, giving off few echoes; said of tissues or structures that reflect relatively few of the ultrasound waves directed at them.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·po·ech·o·ic

(hī'pō-e-kō'ik),
A region in an ultrasound image in which the echoes are weaker or fewer than normal or in the surrounding regions.
[hypo- + echo + -ic]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hypoechoic

adjective Referring to an abnormal reduction in echoes by ultrasonography, usually attributed to a pathologic change in tissue density.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

hypoechoic

Imaging adjective Relating to an abnormal ↓ in echoes by ultrasonography, due to a pathologic change in tissue density
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hy·po·ech·o·ic

(hī'pō-ĕ-kō'ik)
Pertaining to a region in an ultrasound image in which the echoes are weaker or fewer than normal or in the surrounding regions.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultrasound gives information about many features of thyroid cancer, such as whether a mass is solid, hypoechoic, taller than it is wide, and whether it has microcalcifications and irregular margins.
A hypoechoic periphery or compressed myometrium can be seen with a fibroid by endovaginal ultrasound, but not necessarily by transabdominal ultrasound.
The ultrasonograph revealed a focal lesion of the left lobe of the liver, which was solid, partly mixed, and contained a predominantly hyperechoic zone (10 cm in diameter, including some smaller hypoechoic areas and beams spreading radially into the adjacent parenchyma).
Sonographic breast anatomy can be divided into 3 categories based on the echogenicity of tissues: hyperechoic structures, medium echogenic structures and hypoechoic structures.[2,14]
Nodule echogenicity (hypoechoic, isoechoic, hyperechoic) is described relative to thyroid parenchyma with hypoechogenicity having an association with malignancy (Figure 4).
Hyperechoic masses were seen in 6 cases and hypoechoic in 12 cases.
The mass was hypoechoic and heterogeneous and involved three-quarters of the circumference of the esophageal lumen, involving all esophageal wall layers to the adventitia.
Meanwhile, sonographic appearances are a well-circumscribed hypoechoic or isoechoic oval masses, with enhanced through transmission [6].
On axial scan of the right inguinal region, a hypoechoic mass was incidentally discovered by low-frequency convex probe (C5-2) [Figure 1]a.
In the ultrasonography of second case, the dependent portion of bladder appeared hypoechoic and upper part appeared anechoic.
Diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis was made due to hypoechoic areas in the right renal vein area suggesting thrombosis at first sight.
Ultrasonography revealed a well-defined hypoechoic mass with hyperechoic centres.