hypocupremia

hypocupremia

 [hi″po-ku-pre´me-ah]
abnormally diminished concentration of copper in the blood.

hy·po·cu·pre·mi·a

(hī'pō-kū-prē'mē-ă),
Reduced copper content of the blood; found in Wilson disease because ceruloplasmin is depressed, even though serum albumin-attached copper is increased.
[hypo- + L. cuprum, copper, + G. haima, blood]

hy·po·cu·pre·mi·a

(hī'pō-kyū-prē'mē-ă)
Reduced copper content of the blood; found in Wilson disease because the level of ceruloplasmin is depressed, even though the level of copper attached to serum albumin is increased.
Synonym(s): hypocupraemia.
[hypo- + L. cuprum, copper, + G. haima, blood]
References in periodicals archive ?
Decreased serum concentration of copper and zinc in diarrheic people (Kilic et al., 2003; Arora et al., 2006) were congruent to hypocupremia of present study in diarrheic foals.
Deficiency of copper includes many symptoms such as abnormal cardiac function, increased plasma cholesterol, decreased superoxide dismutase, neutropenia, leukopenia, anemia, hypocupremia and weakened iron mobilization [99].
The plasma copper concentration was under the detectable limit of 0.1 pprn (reference interval, 0.07-0.33 ppm), (4) and potential hypocupremia was considered.
Her zinc levels have returned to normal, but hypocupremia persists, although copper levels have improved.
These clinical cases were tentatively diagnosed as leukoderma and confirmed on basis of hypocupremia, low serum ceruloplasmin and absence of melanocytes and melanophores in epidermis on histopathological examination.
Zinc toxicity due to acute or chronic ingestion of high quantities of zinc supplements can also occur and lead to impaired immune response, hypocupremia, microcytosis, and neutropenia.
In the presence of a normal anatomy, a second well-described mechanism of copper malabsorption relates to excess zinc intake causing a secondary hypocupremia. Cytosolic zinc within enterocytes causes upregulation of metallothioneins, which are chelators that normally serve to scavenge excess copper but that lead to intracellular copper sequestration and functional malabsorption when overproduced (9), with copper-sequestering enterocytes eventually sloughing off.
Symptoms of copper deficiency may include anemia, neutropenia, hypoproteinemia, hypocupremia, diarrhea, and bone changes (osteopenia and metaphyseal spurs).
Four patients presented with various neurologic abnormalities along with hypocupremia and hyperzincemia.