hypocapnia


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Related to hypocapnia: hypercapnia

hypocapnia

 [hi″po-kap´ne-ah]
deficiency of carbon dioxide in the blood; it results from hyperventilation and eventually leads to alkalosis. Called also hypocarbia. adj., adj hypocap´nic.

hy·po·cap·ni·a

(hī'pō-kap'nē-ă),
Abnormally decreased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypocarbia
[hypo- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypocapnia

Decreased CO2 or bicarbonate in blood. Hypocapnia, even when marked, is normally well tolerated; transient induction of hypocapnia can lead to life-saving physiologic changes in patients with severe intracranial hypertension or neonatal pulmonary-artery hypertension, but hypocapnia of longer duration in critically ill patients adversely affects outcomes. Prophylactic induction of hypocapnia has no clinical role.

hypocapnia

↓ Arterial CO2

hy·po·cap·ni·a

(hī'pō-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally decreased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypocarbia.
[hypo- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypocapnia

Reduced amounts of carbon dioxide in the blood, as after HYPERVENTILATION.

hy·po·cap·ni·a

(hī'pō-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally decreased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypocarbia.
[hypo- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]
References in periodicals archive ?
Classification of transient loss of consciousness Traumatic T-LOC * Concussion Non-traumatic T-LOC * Syncope * Epileptic seizure * Psychogenic pseudosyncope * Hypoglycaemia * Hypoxia * Hyperventilation with hypocapnia * Intoxication * Vertebrobasilar TIA T-LOC = transient loss of consciousness; TIA = transient ischaemic attack.
This assumption is based the findings of our previous study, which suggested hypocapnia as the main factor underlying the decrease in both ocular blood flows during exhaustive exercise (Ikemura and Hayashi, 2012b).
Remarkably, larger differences in hyperventilation were associated with consistently smaller intergroup differences (1-way ANOVA, P = 0.025) in Pa[O.sub.2] and even smaller differences when hypocapnia was accounted for (standard Pa[O.sub.2], P = 0.082), thus indicating a reduced efficiency of pulmonary exchange despite normal pH values.
The issue at stake here is that although this study demonstrated that hyperoxaemia and hypocapnia may increase the severity of brain injury after intrapartum asphyxia, Tracy et al.
This condition is related to recurring attacks of apnea, hypopnea and hyperpnea, sleep disruptions, arousals, intermittent hypoxemia, hypocapnia, and hypercapnia, and intrathoracic pressure changes.
As Curley and colleagues note, (5) "hypocapnia remains a common--and generally underappreciated--component of many disease states." They add that "hypocapnia may be a pathogenic entity in the setting of critical illness." (5)
This results in hypocapnia, which will return to normal levels around five weeks postpartum.
For example, the specificity of cerebral perfusion changes under hypercapnia or hypocapnia states has been evaluated [18].
For example, hypoxia stimulates ventilation, subsequently leading to hypocapnia, and subsequently, apnoea.
* Stimulation of respiration causing initial hypocapnia and respiratory alkalosis
Arterial blood gas analysis showed hypoxemia and mild hypocapnia (Pa[O.sub.2] 53 mm Hg and PaC[O.sub.2] 33.8 mm Hg on room air).