hypocapnia

(redirected from hypocapnea)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

hypocapnia

 [hi″po-kap´ne-ah]
deficiency of carbon dioxide in the blood; it results from hyperventilation and eventually leads to alkalosis. Called also hypocarbia. adj., adj hypocap´nic.

hy·po·cap·ni·a

(hī'pō-kap'nē-ă),
Abnormally decreased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypocarbia
[hypo- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypocapnia

/hy·po·cap·nia/ (-kap´ne-ah) deficiency of carbon dioxide in the blood.hypocap´nic

hypocapnia

[-kap′nē·ə]
an abnormally low arterial carbon dioxide level. Also called hypocarbia.

hypocapnia

Decreased CO2 or bicarbonate in blood. Hypocapnia, even when marked, is normally well tolerated; transient induction of hypocapnia can lead to life-saving physiologic changes in patients with severe intracranial hypertension or neonatal pulmonary-artery hypertension, but hypocapnia of longer duration in critically ill patients adversely affects outcomes. Prophylactic induction of hypocapnia has no clinical role.

hypocapnia

↓ Arterial CO2

hy·po·cap·ni·a

(hī'pō-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally decreased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypocarbia.
[hypo- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypocapnia

Reduced amounts of carbon dioxide in the blood, as after HYPERVENTILATION.

hypocapnia

lower than normal partial pressure (tension) of carbon dioxide ( P CO2) in the lung alveoli and in the arterial blood, hence respiratory alkalosis. If severe, can cause dizziness or confusion (by constrictive effect on brain blood vessels, reducing blood flow), disturbances of sensation and tetany (by reducing ionized calcium in the blood). See also hyperventilation.

hypocapnia

abnormally low blood levels of bicarbonate (HCO3-) and reduced buffer activity

hy·po·cap·ni·a

(hī'pō-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally decreased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypocarbia.
[hypo- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypocapnia (hī´pōkap´nēə),

n a deficiency of carbon dioxide in the blood.

hypocapnia

diminished carbon dioxide in the blood.