hypnotic

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hypnotic

 [hip-not´ik]
1. causing sleep; called also somniferous.
2. an agent that causes sleep; called also somnifacient.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik),
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep. Synonym(s): soporific (2)
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

(hĭp-nŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to hypnosis.
b. Of or relating to hypnotism.
2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep; soporific: read the bedtime story in a hypnotic voice.
n.
1.
a. A person who is hypnotized.
b. A person who can be hypnotized.
2. An agent that causes sleep; a soporific.

hyp·not′i·cal·ly adv.

hypnotic

adjective
1. Relating to hynosis.
2. Inducing sleep.
3. Referring to a trance-like state.
4. Relating to a hypnotic agent noun An agent that induces hypnosis, trance state or sleep; a sedative or CNS depressant, of which benzodiazepines is a drug of choice for 'primary' insomnia; short-acting hypnotics–eg, triazolam and oxazolam are used to induce sleep; to maintain sleep throughout the night, long-acting hypnotics–eg, flurazepam, are used.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

Any drug or agent that induces sleep. There are various classes of hypnotic drugs. These include acylic ureides; alcohols; amides; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; carbamates; CHLORAL derivatives; quinazolone derivatives; piperidineduines; and certain ANTIHISTAMINES.

Hypnotic

A medication that makes a person sleep.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]
References in periodicals archive ?
"My counsel tells me there is no controlling legal authority that says there was any violation of any law," he repeated hypnotically, seven times.
The admissibility of hypnotically induced testimony depends on the forum in which the case is litigated.
For as long as I care to linger I am afforded a visual taste of an undersea storm, momentarily lost in a smokescreen of bubbles and rocked hypnotically by enormous swells.
Largely used to justify the scuttling or diminishing of as many social programs for the poor as possible, most middle-class Americans hypnotically joined the chant.
Being in the White House is hypnotically compelling.
"Curing some internal discrepancy," a cafe patron compulsively sifts sand onto the floor; a man believes he is in conversation with a woman, then "even as he holds this course, he begins to drift back, this version dissolves, another slips into its place." A book of advice for colonists is read out loud hypnotically, desperately.
Surprisingly, no law enforcement officials attending the public meeting spoke to defend the use of hypnotically enhanced testimony in criminal cases, although two professional people who have hypnotized witnesses for the law did testify.
Some investigators have shown that college students in a hypnotically induced happy or sad mood have "statedependent" memory: Recall of a word list is much better if a student is in the same mood during recall as when the list was first learned (SN: 4/18/81, p.253).
Although lacking in plot and dramatic twists, Boldl's prose in Der Atem der Vogel is captivating, with its hypnotically quiet and meditative narrative stream.
The 42-year-old Mack is known to many Filipino fans because of his hypnotically violent work on Kabuki, the series which followed a dedicated, sickle-wielding assassin of the same name in Japan.
Straitstimes.com described their performances as "hypnotically stunning spectacles."
Similarly, Martins survival in a predatory environment on Mount Hood is like watching any hypnotically heartfelt National Geographic episode.