hypnotic

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hypnotic

 [hip-not´ik]
1. causing sleep; called also somniferous.
2. an agent that causes sleep; called also somnifacient.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik),
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep. Synonym(s): soporific (2)
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

/hyp·not·ic/ (hip-not´ik)
1. inducing sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hypnotic

(hĭp-nŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to hypnosis.
b. Of or relating to hypnotism.
2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep; soporific: read the bedtime story in a hypnotic voice.
n.
1.
a. A person who is hypnotized.
b. A person who can be hypnotized.
2. An agent that causes sleep; a soporific.

hyp·not′i·cal·ly adv.

hypnotic

[hipnot′ik]
Etymology: Gk, hypnos, sleep
one of a class of drugs often used as sedatives. See also hypnagogue.

hypnotic

adjective
1. Relating to hynosis.
2. Inducing sleep.
3. Referring to a trance-like state.
4. Relating to a hypnotic agent noun An agent that induces hypnosis, trance state or sleep; a sedative or CNS depressant, of which benzodiazepines is a drug of choice for 'primary' insomnia; short-acting hypnotics–eg, triazolam and oxazolam are used to induce sleep; to maintain sleep throughout the night, long-acting hypnotics–eg, flurazepam, are used.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

Any drug or agent that induces sleep. There are various classes of hypnotic drugs. These include acylic ureides; alcohols; amides; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; carbamates; CHLORAL derivatives; quinazolone derivatives; piperidineduines; and certain ANTIHISTAMINES.

Hypnotic

A medication that makes a person sleep.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

1. pertaining to or inducing hypnosis or sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
References in periodicals archive ?
A second approach is to allow hypnotically induced testimony to be admitted only if the trial court determines, under the totality of the circumstances, that the proposed testimony is sufficiently reliable to merit admission.
Being in the White House is hypnotically compelling.
A book of advice for colonists is read out loud hypnotically, desperately.
Surprisingly, no law enforcement officials attending the public meeting spoke to defend the use of hypnotically enhanced testimony in criminal cases, although two professional people who have hypnotized witnesses for the law did testify.
Some investigators have shown that college students in a hypnotically induced happy or sad mood have "statedependent" memory: Recall of a word list is much better if a student is in the same mood during recall as when the list was first learned (SN: 4/18/81, p.
The 42-year-old Mack is known to many Filipino fans because of his hypnotically violent work on Kabuki, the series which followed a dedicated, sickle-wielding assassin of the same name in Japan.
Similarly, Martins survival in a predatory environment on Mount Hood is like watching any hypnotically heartfelt National Geographic episode.
This complex state of desire is conveyed cinematically in actions that are passionally heightened and shaped ("Hail") or hypnotically slowed, like the action of turning in "Heroine as She Turns to Face Me.
20PM Burt Lancaster in bitterly amusing WWII drama that's hypnotically strange.
So while the story isn't of much consequence, it does serve as a decent link to the songs, which grab from the first moment that we witness a unit of troops hypnotically chanting the powerful opening number.
The heavy pendulum swings hypnotically built in the late 19th century.