hypnotic


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Related to hypnotic: Hypnotic drugs

hypnotic

 [hip-not´ik]
1. causing sleep; called also somniferous.
2. an agent that causes sleep; called also somnifacient.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik),
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep. Synonym(s): soporific (2)
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

/hyp·not·ic/ (hip-not´ik)
1. inducing sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hypnotic

(hĭp-nŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to hypnosis.
b. Of or relating to hypnotism.
2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep; soporific: read the bedtime story in a hypnotic voice.
n.
1.
a. A person who is hypnotized.
b. A person who can be hypnotized.
2. An agent that causes sleep; a soporific.

hyp·not′i·cal·ly adv.

hypnotic

[hipnot′ik]
Etymology: Gk, hypnos, sleep
one of a class of drugs often used as sedatives. See also hypnagogue.

hypnotic

adjective
1. Relating to hynosis.
2. Inducing sleep.
3. Referring to a trance-like state.
4. Relating to a hypnotic agent noun An agent that induces hypnosis, trance state or sleep; a sedative or CNS depressant, of which benzodiazepines is a drug of choice for 'primary' insomnia; short-acting hypnotics–eg, triazolam and oxazolam are used to induce sleep; to maintain sleep throughout the night, long-acting hypnotics–eg, flurazepam, are used.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

Any drug or agent that induces sleep. There are various classes of hypnotic drugs. These include acylic ureides; alcohols; amides; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; carbamates; CHLORAL derivatives; quinazolone derivatives; piperidineduines; and certain ANTIHISTAMINES.

Hypnotic

A medication that makes a person sleep.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic (hipnot´ik),

n 1. a drug that induces sleep or depresses the central nervous system at a cortical level.
adj 2. causing sleep or a trance. See also sedative.

hypnotic

1. pertaining to or inducing hypnosis or sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are still leading hypnosis researchers who dismiss the claims of hypnotic psi out-of-hand as magical thinking (Nadon & Kihlstrom, 1987) while others give a degree of credibility to the evidence (Unestahl, personal communication, August, 2003; Wickramasekera, 1989).
For each year of the study, the prescription of an antidepressant was associated with an increased length of hypnotic treatment.
6) Although benzodiazepines increase sleep time and efficiency, patients quickly develop tolerance to the hypnotic effects.
In the R-rated erotic hypnotic show, volunteers will become Chippendale dancers, Dr.
Students completed the HGSHS:A, a measure of hypnotic depth, the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), General Dissociation Scale (GDS), the Inner Subjective Experiences scoring for the HGSHS:A, a measure of automatic hypnotic responding, and the Tellegen Absorption Scale (TAS).
All of these elements -- heavy percussion, slurred notes, and hypnotic repetitiveness -- figure heavily in many modem popular music idioms.
Red Exciting Event and Magenta Energy, both 2000, offer dazzling combinations of rose, stop-sign red, and orange with other, equally hypnotic areas in bare outline.
A slew of entertainment dot-coms may have quickly come and gone, but not Hypnotic.
People who enter deep hypnotic states with great ease offer valuable opportunities for studying mystical experiences, in Cardena's view.
To an alternately hypnotic and discordant score (by Ekhart Ehlers and Thom Willems), a flamboyant, extravagant dance-drama gradually erupts, invoking (amongst other things) Wuthering Heights, The Valley of the Dolls, and Javanese mythology, weaving the dancers into complex patterns and intricate choreographic knots, then changing the focus so that the audience rushes excitedly elsewhere.