hypnopompic


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hypnopompic

 [hip″no-pom´pik]
persisting after sleep; applied to hallucinations occurring on awakening.

hyp·no·pom·pic

(hip'nō-pom'pik),
Denoting the occurrence of visions or dreams during the drowsy state following sleep.
[hypno- + G. pompē, procession]

hypnopompic

/hyp·no·pom·pic/ (hip″no-pom´pik) persisting after sleep; applied to hallucinations occurring on awakening.

hypnopompic

(hĭp′nə-pŏm′pĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to the partially conscious state that precedes complete awakening from sleep.

hypnopompic

adjective Referring to the state immediately before awakening.
Hallucinatory phenomena may occur during the hypnopompic state, which have no pathological significance.

hypnopompic

Pertaining to the period during which a person is waking up from sleep. Of images, dreams or hallucinations occurring during this period.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much like air and water, the states of sleep and wakefulness flow together and coexist in an undifferentiated, hypnopompic haze.
Barnhill's patient swayed the author though the patient already has a psychotic illness (as well as many other possible contributors such as drug use), but even in sleep disorders hypnopompic or hypnagogic hallucinations are neither exclusive to narcolepsy, nor particularly pathognomonic.
Hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations during sleep paralysis: neurological and cultural construction of the night-mare.
Skeptics have linked them to hypnagogic and hypnopompic visions and confabulation under hypnosis.
According to Nicolas Slonimsky, "Etiologically, this type of composition is hypnopompic, for it creates a subliminal state between a strong dream and a sudden reality" (Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Musicians, 8th ed.
Inspired by that encounter (which others have described as a "classic hypnopompic hallucination"), Firmage has spent the last year writing a book called "The Truth.
9] Besides excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and uncontrollable sleep attacks, the classic symptoms of narcolepsy include: cataplexy (short episodes of muscle weakness and/or paralysis without change in consciousness that are precipitated by strong emotion); sleep paralysis (the inability to move muscles while falling asleep or on awakening); and hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations (dreamlike images occurring at sleep onset or on awakening, respectively).
This action explicated ought to help the reader encounter Will's "exceptional states of consciousness" in the remainder of the narration, which continue to include those in Fliess's Group II (sleep, derealization, depersonalization, and fantasy and delusion), but are joined by those in Group I (hypnosis, the hypnagogic state, the hypnopompic state, "sleepwalking," and hysterical twilight).
Not surprisingly, most ideas for Afrobic choreography come to me during hypnogogic and hypnopompic states--those between sleep and waking.