hypnogram

hypnogram

(hĭp'nō-grăm) [Gr. hypnos, sleep, + gramma, drawing]
A chart representing the different stages of sleep in a person studied in a sleep laboratory.
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(b) Hypnogram from the entire night illustrating the sleep stages; W: wakefulness, R: REM, N1-N3: non-REM sleep (stage 1-3), Sp[O.sub.2]: oxygen saturation, and EtC[O.sub.2]: end tidal carbon dioxide.
(b) Hypnogram from the entire night illustrating the sleep stages; W: wakefulness, R: REM, N1-N3: non-REM sleep (stage 1- 3), Sp[O.sub.2]: oxygen saturation, and EtC[O.sub.2]: end tidal carbon dioxide.
The data are accompanied by a hypnogram, a temporal profile of the sleep stages scored by an expert neurologist every 30 seconds of recording.
Measures were estimated per nonoverlapping 30 second EEG data segments over the entirety of each subject's recording in order to correspond with the subject's hypnogram. Channel C4-A1 was selected for analysis in most of the subjects.
Silber delivered the following Hartland-inspired "ego-augmenting" hypnogram (1980, p.213)--an amended, expanded version of his earlier "hypnopoetic induction" (1968)--at the metronomic rate of 90 beats a minute (or at the patient's pulse rate) and, then, gradually slowing the pace down to 60 beats (p.215), in the hope that the hypnotherapeutic intervention would be significantly enhanced by "linking [the hypnotic experience] with the ...
The author gratefully acknowledges that the passages quoted from Hartland's 1971 paper (1971c)--Hartland, John, "Further Observations on the Use of 'Ego-Strengthening' Techniques", American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, Volume 14, Issue 1, (July 1971), pp.1-8--and the passages quoted from Silber's (1980) paper--Silber, Samuel, "Induction of Hypnosis by Poetic Hypnogram", The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, Volume 22, Issue 4, (April 1980), pp.212-216--have been reprinted by the permission of The American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (http://www.asch.net).
A normal, healthy pattern of such sleep stages is observed in a hypnogram presented in Figure 2.
The sleep structure of a representative boy at each longitudinal assessment is illustrated in hypnograms (Figure 1).
Therefore, durations of each parameter were evaluated to create hypnograms and averaged in each groups for statistical analysis.
In Figure 5, the hypnograms of both epileptic (below) and normal (above) rats are displayed, recording a high overall difference between the two graphs.